Essential Reading

Financial News, November 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Essential Reading


Books that provide background information for

a career in financial services:Finance: a Fine Art, by Michel Fleuriet.

(pub. 2002, John Wiley & Sons, [pounds sterling]19.99,

298pp).

A former chief executive of

Merrill Lynch France and former chairman

of HSBC France, Fleuriet tracks the

history of banking and explains price

earnings ratios and bond pricing, as well

as the 1998 near-collapse of the hedge

fund Long Term Capital Management.

Liar's Poker, by Michael Lewis (pub. 1989,

[pounds sterling]6.39, 298pp). A former bond salesman

paints an unflattering picture of greed,

ambition and extravagance on 1980s Wall

Street. Highly readable and witty.

The Death of Gentlemanly Capitalism

(pub. 2000, [pounds sterling]5.39, 416pp). Philip Augar, a

former City of London broker, traces the

decline of British financial services firms

in the City from the 1980s onwards.

Mrs Moneypenny: Survival in the City

(pub. 2003, Piatkus, [pounds sterling]12.99, 176pp)

Mrs Moneypenny, a columnist for Financial

News, describes life in the City of London

through entertaining anecdotes mixed

with factual information. A former banker

herself, she has little time for women who

complain of discrimination.

The City of London, by David Kynaston.

This four-volume work traces the history

of the City over 200 years. Anecdotal as

well as factual, it is an exhaustive social

and financial guide.

Talking from 9 to 5: How Women's and

Men's Conversational Styles Affect who

Gets Heard, who Gets Credit, and What

Gets Done at Work, by Deborah Tannen

(pub. 1996, Virago Press, [pounds sterling]7.99, 224pp;

Market Wizards: Interviews with Top

Traders, ed. Jack D. Schwager (pub. 1989;

HarperCollins, [pounds sterling]12.99, 458pp). Interviews

with traders giving insights into their stories

of extraordinary success.

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, by

Edwin Lefevre (pub. 1923; John Wiley &

Son, [pounds sterling]14.99, 300pp).

A thinly disguised

biography of Jesse Livermore, who started

speculating in New England bucket shops

at the turn of the 20th century and soon

moved to Wall Street, where he made and

lost his fortune several times.

When Genius Failed, by Roger Lowenstein

(pub. 2000; Fourth Estate, [pounds sterling]7.99, 275pp).

The story of the hedge fund Long Term

Capital Management, whose near-collapse

prompted fears for the stability of the

international financial system. (Recommended

by Christine Morrissey, managing

director and European head of fixed

income derivatives, UBS Warburg)

Bonfire of the Vanities, by Tom Wolfe

(pub. …

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