Britain's Daftest Jobs; and Who Do You Think Is Footing the Bill for Them?

Daily Mail (London), November 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

Britain's Daftest Jobs; and Who Do You Think Is Footing the Bill for Them?


Byline: STEVE DOUGHTY

THE salary is nearly [pounds sterling]30,000 a year. The perks include 'comprehensive pension and healthcare schemes' as well as training.

There's also a gym, a subsidised restaurant and a creche for the right candidate - who must be 'dynamic and experienced'.

And what is this demanding role?

It's telling people to eat more fruit and vegetables, known in local government circles as a Five-a-day Executive.

The role was yesterday named as the daftest taxpayer-funded post in the country. It beat tough competition in a richly-rewarded field of so-called Equality Officers, Public Sector Co- ordinators and Social Inclusion Workers.

Dozens of the five-a-day executives have been appointed by the Health Service, according to the Adam Smith Institute, the free market think tank that bestowed the accolade.

Their job is to persuade people to eat more fruit and vegetables to 'improve health and wellbeing' and 'reduce inequalities'.

One such post is on offer this week in Brent, North London, to those who think they can 'make eating more fruit and vegetables fun and desirable'.

The successful candidate - ' dynamic, motivated and experienced' - will be paid a salary of [pounds sterling]28,903.

On top of that, the NHS Brent Primary Care Trust is offering a string of perks including pension and health schemes.

Institute director Dr Eamonn Butler said yesterday: 'Public sector jobs are the only growth area of the economy. Last year, for example, the civil service took on 23,500 extra people, more than the entire Brussels bureaucracy.' He also claimed that the benefits of eating five portions of fruit or vegetables a day were 'open to question' and that eating three a day had the same benefits.

'Perhaps it's time that all these five-a- day co- ordinators became three-a-day co-ordinators and took a 40 per cent pay cut,' he added.

Five-a-day co-ordinators instruct those they deal with - among 'a range of agencies in culturally diverse communities' - that a portion of fruit or vegetables is around 80 grammes.

According to a five-a-day project in Acton, West London, fresh, cooked, frozen, chilled, canned and dried fruit and vegetables count towards the five portions, but beans and pulses can be counted only once a day, and rice, pasta, potatoes, yams and cassava do not count.

A portion, clients are told, could be two satsumas; three tablespoons of frozen vegetables; one cereal bowl of green salad; a tablespoon of dried fruit; or three tablespoons of tinned fruit.

Other jobs cited as contenders for the silliest title by the Adam Smith Institute include Real Nappy Officers, hired by some councils to promote 'real' over disposable nappies; and Walking Officers, hired to promote walking. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Britain's Daftest Jobs; and Who Do You Think Is Footing the Bill for Them?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.