'Revolutions': What the Critics Are Saying

The Florida Times Union, November 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

'Revolutions': What the Critics Are Saying


The Matrix Revolutions, the third -- and final, according to producer Joel Silver -- installment of the Matrix saga, opened this week on 20,000 screens worldwide.

Fans of the series no doubt rushed to theaters for its Wednesday opening, but megaplexes still will be packed this weekend with moviegoers eager to see the continuing story of the war raging between machines and human insurgents burrowed near the Earth's core.

Early reviews of The Matrix Revolutions are mixed. Here's a sample of what movie critics around the country are saying:

PHOEBE FLOWERS, SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL (**, 2 stars):

In order to derive any pleasure at all from The Matrix Revolutions, the final chapter in the stylish, sporadically substantial man vs. machine trilogy, a whole lot of forgiving and forgetting is necessary.

You have to first let go of the residual disappointment of Reloaded, the second installment released earlier this year to plenty of profit but diminished acclaim, and the understandable, but sadly futile, hope that Revolutions would be better. You must be willing to overlook a truly hideous opening hour, marred by dialogue so bad that it seems like it was written not by the Wachowski brothers, but by the same team of soap opera-educated monkeys George Lucas must have secretly employed for his recent Star Wars episodes.

And you have to forget, as much as possible, the first Matrix, an exhilarating, riveting experience that never succumbed, as this does, to self-conscious solemnity, senseless riddles and mawkish, protracted death scenes.

In all, there about 50 worthwhile minutes in the two-hour-plus Revolutions, and they are not quite mind-blowing enough to redeem the joyless remainder.

CHRIS HEWITT, KNIGHT-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE (*1/2, 1 1/2 STARS):

The end of life as we know it has never seemed as dull as it does in The Matrix Revolutions. …

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