Future of Medicine Is in a Blend of Approaches

By Massey, Patrick B. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 10, 2003 | Go to article overview

Future of Medicine Is in a Blend of Approaches


Massey, Patrick B., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Patrick B. Massey, M.D.

When I spoke to a group of young doctors recently, I told them that the way we have practiced medicine for the past 50 years is coming to an end. The future is the integration of traditional and nontraditional approaches.

This trend was very evident last week, when I participated in a panel discussion for a local PBS station in Urbana on the use and safety of nontraditional therapies.

With me on the panel were a physician who practices traditional medicine, a yoga instructor, a nurse who practices healing touch, a chiropractor, an acupuncturist, a massage therapist, a tai chi instructor and a law professor.

Years ago, this would have been the perfect recipe for disagreement and loud discussion. Not so today. In fact, the moderator found it difficult to find any topic of disagreement among the panelists. The physician, chiropractor and massage therapist have been referring patients to each other for years. They have respect for each other and the roles of their therapies in the medical system.

The tai chi instructor is working on his Ph.D. in kinesiology, developing tai chi as a form of physical therapy. The yoga instructor already has a Ph.D. and works with patients with chronic medical problems.

I had a preview of the national PBS program "Alternative Fix" before it aired recently. A number of internationally recognized physicians argued the merits and failings of nontraditional medicine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Future of Medicine Is in a Blend of Approaches
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.