Press Restrictions Must GO: Media Leaders Join Together to Protest Persian Gulf War Coverage Restrictions; Cite Problems, Call for a Meeting with Defense Secretary

By Gersh, Debra | Editor & Publisher, July 6, 1991 | Go to article overview

Press Restrictions Must GO: Media Leaders Join Together to Protest Persian Gulf War Coverage Restrictions; Cite Problems, Call for a Meeting with Defense Secretary


Gersh, Debra, Editor & Publisher


Press restrictions must GO

The war in the Persian Gulf may officially be over, but the battle for more press freedom of coverage rages on.

In a follow-up to a letter sent this spring to Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney by 15 Washington bureau chiefs (E&P, May 11, P. 21), 17 leaders U.S. media have sent Cheney another letter and a report that describes the Gulf war as "the most under-covered major conflict in modern American history." They have also requested a meeting with Cheney.

"We believe the Pentagon pool arrangements during Operation Desert Storm made it impossible for reporters and photographers to tell the public the full story of the war in a timely fashion," the letter stated. "Moreover, we believe it is imperative that the Gulf war not serve as a model for future coverage."

The letter was signed by Roone Arledge, president, ABC News; James K. Batten, chairman of the board and chief executive officer, Knight-Ridder Inc.; Louis D. Boccardi, president and CEO, the Associated Press, who also was designated to arrange the meeting with Cheney; Max Frankel, executive editor, the New York Times; Peter S. Prichard, editor, USA Today; Michael G. Gartner, president, NBC News; Katharine Graham, chairman of the board, the Washington Post Co.; Tom Johnson, president, CNN; Peter Kann, publisher and president, the Wall Street Journal; David Laventhol, publisher, the Los Angeles Times; Jason McManus, editor in chief, Time Warner Inc.; Donald Newhouse, president, the Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.; Eric Ober, president, CBS News; Burl Osborne, publisher and editor, the Dallas Morning News; Arnold Rosenfeld, editor in chief, Cox Newspapers; Al Rossiter Jr., senior vice president/executive editor, United Press International; and Richard M. Smith, editor in chief and president, Newsweek Inc.

Along with the letter and report was a Statement of Principles which the signers believe "should govern future arrangements for news coverage of the United States military in combat."

The ten principles are:

* "Independent reporting will be the principles means of coverage of U.S. military operations.

* "The use of pools should be limited to the kind envisioned by the Sidle Commission. Pools are meant to bring a representative group of journalists along with the first elements of any major U.S. military operation. These pools should last no longer than the very first stages of deployment - the initial 24 hours to 36 hours - and should be disbanded rapidly in favor of independent coverage. Pools are not to serve as the standard means of covering U.S. forces.

* "Some pools may be appropriate for events or in places where open coverage is physically impossible, but the existence of such special-purpose pools will not cancel the principle of independent coverage. If news organizations are able to cover pooled events independently, they may do so.

* "Journalists in a combat zone will be credentialed by the U.S. military and will be required to abide by a clear set of military security guidelines that protect U.S. forces and their operations. Violation of the guidelines can result in suspension of credentials or revocation of credentials and expulsion from the combat zone.

* "Journalists will be provided access to all major military units.

* "Military public affairs officers should act as liaisons but should not interfere with the reporting process.

* "News material - words and pictures - will be not subject to prior military security review.

* "The military will be responsible for the transportation of pools. Field commanders should be instructed to permit journalists to ride on military vehicles and aircraft whenever feasible.

* "The military will supply PAOs [public affairs officers] with timely, secure, compatible transmission facilities for pool material and will make these facilities available whenever possible for filing independent coverage. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Press Restrictions Must GO: Media Leaders Join Together to Protest Persian Gulf War Coverage Restrictions; Cite Problems, Call for a Meeting with Defense Secretary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.