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By Walkup, Nancy | School Arts, November 2003 | Go to article overview

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Walkup, Nancy, School Arts


Prints and Patterns

For Teachers

Printmaking and its resulting multiple images are fascinating to students of all ages. Even the youngest students can experience simple forms of relief printing, and the other traditional printmaking methods--intaglio, lithography, and serigraphy--are adaptable to meet the abilities of your students. The Internet offers a number of online printmaking resources that provide inspiration and enhance understanding of printmaking processes.

On Printmaking

66.113.241.131/lessons/envs/live/ htdocs/lesson46.htm Haring Kids Lesson Plans for Parents, Teachers, Institutions. Artist Keith Haring's website, Haring Kids, offers I Can Dance to the Music of Everything, a printmaking lesson for children based on Haring's work.

www.worldprintmakers.com/ english/opm.htm This website provides printmaking definitions, history, techniques, and terminology, along with exhibitions of contemporary printmakers from around the world.

www.getty.edu/artsednet/resources /Aeia/history-lp.html Integrating Art History and Criticism, ArtsEdNet. This instructional unit, Printmaking with a Japanese Influence, compares styles, subjects, and themes of Japanese block printing with the prints of Mary Cassatt. Though designed for grade four, it can easily be adapted for any level.

www.nga.gov/collection/gallery/ cassatt/cassatt-main1.html View and read about twelve prints by Mary Cassatt found in the National Gallery of Art.

spectacle.berkeley.edu/%7Efiorillo/ Browse these two sites to learn more about the art of woodblock prints called ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) that flourished in the seventeenth through nineteenth century Edo Period in Japan.

www.childrensmuseum.org/ andywarhol/teachers.htm The Andy Warhol Myths Series and Studio online teachers' guide was developed for the Children's Museum of Indianapolis for an exhibit.

Prints and Patterns

For Students

Directions: Visit the websites listed below and answer the questions on a separate piece of paper. …

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