Mr. Rogers, Politics, God; Concerts Cover Range of Themes

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 20, 2003 | Go to article overview

Mr. Rogers, Politics, God; Concerts Cover Range of Themes


Byline: Lisa Rauschart, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Ask for Garnet Rogers in the hour or so before a performance and you won't find him hunkered down in the dressing room. Instead, the Canadian singer-songwriter is most likely to be in the front of the house, hanging out with the crowd.

"I want to do more than just breeze through," says Mr. Rogers, who will be performing at Jammin' Java in Vienna tonight. "I want to find out how people are doing."

The interactive approach has served Mr. Rogers well ever since he was 8. That's when he picked out Bob Dylan's "Desolation Row" on a ukulele, and began "interacting" with the different types of music that came through the family radio: Leadbelly, the Carter family, and the classical music his mother loved.

These days the strapping, 6-foot-4, 48-year-old Mr. Rogers is more likely to be cradling a guitar than a uke, and he's taken up other instruments as well - the violin, for example, and the flute.

While still a teenager, he began touring with his brother Stan. Mr. Rogers continued as a solo act after his brother's death in a 1983 plane accident, developing his own distinctive style and sound.

The Rogers style is introspective, with songs about ordinary people struggling to find different layers of meaning through a world of obfuscation.

"I think my songs are simpler now, about celebrating little things like friendships, or concepts like enduring love and fidelity," he says.

Meanwhile, his powerful yet supple baritone makes him a relative rarity among singer-songwriters. This is one songwriter whose voice is as good as his songs.

* * *

Over at the 9:30 Club on Monday, English singer-songwriter Billy Bragg combines the personal and political in a move reminiscent of music icon Woody Guthrie. He'll be performing as part of the Tell Us the Truth Tour.

"Music gives you an opportunity to put your ideas forward," says Mr. Bragg of the tour, which counts MTV's "Rock the Vote" among its sponsors. "It's a solvent of cultural bias."

Mr. Bragg is nothing if not political, taking issue with European racism as well as the American media's take on the war, which he feels is narrow and one-sided. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mr. Rogers, Politics, God; Concerts Cover Range of Themes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.