Divine Injustice: Papal Influence Italian Politics

By Thornton, Ryan | Harvard International Review, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Divine Injustice: Papal Influence Italian Politics


Thornton, Ryan, Harvard International Review


For a country that contains the seat of Roman Catholicism, Italy is decidedly un-Catholic in its politics. Despite the declaration of abortion as immoral by Pope Paul VI in 1968, abortion has been legal in Italy for 25 years; despite the Church's 2,000-year-old condemnation of divorce, 12 percent of all marriages in the 98 percent Catholic country end in it; despite the Vatican's strong denunciation of human cloning, the Italian government has yet to fully ban it. The distance between Rome and the Vatican has continued to widen beyond the width of the Tiber River.

In the past year, Pope John Paul II took a strong position on the war in Iraq, calling it a "defeat for humanity." Meeting personally with UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, he won widespread approval throughout Europe for his efforts to bring all parties to the table of peace. However, while the Vatican's clear stance on the war was popular with the Italian people, it was all but ignored by the Italian government. Going against domestic, international, and religious sentiment, the politicians in Rome were some of the greatest European supporters of US President George Bush. Giving the United States complete access to the state's military and civilian infrastructure in order to topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's regime, the Italian government made a very risky move in defiance of both popular sentiment and papal authority.

The Vatican and Rome have long had a tumultuous relationship. When Victor Emmanuel I sacked and declared Rome the capital of a unified Italy in 1870, Pope Pius IX shut himself up in the Vatican until his death, declaring himself"prisoner." Pius IX'S antagonistic policy toward the Italian government banned all Catholics from running in Italian elections and thus maintained itself for over half a century. This antagonism led Italy to oppose the Vatican's inclusion in international treaties and organizations, including the League of Nations--a precedent preserved to this day (the Holy See is one of the few sovereign states in the world denied a seat in the UN General Assembly). The 1929 Lateran Treaty officially reconciled Italy and the Vatican, but the treaty, coming from the Fascist Benito Mussolini, provided the Vatican with unfavorable terms. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Divine Injustice: Papal Influence Italian Politics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.