21st-Century Exploring: In This Month's Special Report, Self-Confessed Mountain Obsessive Paul Deegan Offers Up Some Sound Advice for Planning and Executing Your Next Expedition, Reports on Some Expeditions Currently out in the Field and Delves into His Address Book for a Comprehensive Contact List

By Deegan, Paul | Geographical, November 2003 | Go to article overview

21st-Century Exploring: In This Month's Special Report, Self-Confessed Mountain Obsessive Paul Deegan Offers Up Some Sound Advice for Planning and Executing Your Next Expedition, Reports on Some Expeditions Currently out in the Field and Delves into His Address Book for a Comprehensive Contact List


Deegan, Paul, Geographical


Many people feel that in the 21st century we have nothing left to discover. But Nigel Winser, deputy director of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), believes the reality is rather different. "It's true that we aren't far away from being able to tap into global databases that contain a huge amount of geographical information on every corner of the world," he says. "But exploration and discovery isn't just about that: it's more about understanding."

In this year's expeditions special, we hear from explorers and field scientists involved in cutting-edge research and discovery. There's also advice from experienced hands on choosing the right equipment, as well as a practical guide to planning your own expedition.

If our supplement inspires you to star organising your own expedition or field project, you may be interested in attending the Explore 2003 weekend at the RGS-IBG on 22-23 November, where you can meet and talk to more than 100 experts (further details on page 85).

Winser has these words of encouragement for aspiring explorers. "So long as individuals have done their research and have a passion to learn more, I can see absolutely no reason why they can't make a really significant contribution, publish the results and share that knowledge internationally."

10 STEPS TO SUCCESS

Use our easy-to-follow guide to get off to a head start with your expedition plans

1 CHOOSE A REALISTIC OBJECTIVE

According to Shane Winser, head of the Expedition Advisory Centre at the RGS-IBG, it's important for aspiring explorers to define exactly what it is they want to do. "The key is to find a project that you are excited and inspired by," she says. When you have chosen your objective, you should consider carrying out a reconnaissance of the region a few months before the main expedition sets out to ensure your plans are feasible.

2 PICK A COMPATIBLE, COOPERATIVE TEAM

Choose your team with care. You are far more likely to succeed in your objectives with compatible team members who are willing to work together to achieve the agreed objective than if your team is made up of highly qualified or talented individuals who are riven by dissent and in-fighting.

3 SECURE PERMISSIONS AND QUALIFICATIONS

Kayakers require permits for politically sensitive regions, scientists will normally need permission (often at government level) to carry out research, and if the team isn't taking a medical doctor, then many grants require a member to have attended an appropriate first-aid course. But it takes time and effort to secure permits and qualifications, so try to address these issues as soon as the objective has been agreed.

4 SET OUT A REALISTIC BUDGET

Choosing an affordable objective will make it more likely that your expedition will take place. Money can be raised from sponsorship, grants, local fundraising, or taking on an extra part-time job. It's always a good idea to add a contingency of around ten to 20 per cent to your overall budget because problems that require a dollop of cash to solve will invariably crop up. Don't be discouraged if you are dependent on securing a large amount of money, says Rebecca Harris. "Just keep going. At some point it will break. We secured the money from American Express for the Franklin Expedition 12 days after our deadline had passed."

5 APPLY FOR GRANTS ON TIME

Dozens of bodies, from the Mount Everest Foundation to the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, award thousands of grants to individuals and expeditions every year, But according to Hannah Hartog, grants officer at the RGS-IBG, many expeditions miss out on grants because they either miss the deadline or don't meet all of the criteria. "You would be amazed at the number of expeditions that fail to supply a map of the area they want to visit," she says,

6 LIAISE WITH PEOPLE IN THE HOST COUNTRY

Working alongside local people is a fundamental part of many expeditions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

21st-Century Exploring: In This Month's Special Report, Self-Confessed Mountain Obsessive Paul Deegan Offers Up Some Sound Advice for Planning and Executing Your Next Expedition, Reports on Some Expeditions Currently out in the Field and Delves into His Address Book for a Comprehensive Contact List
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.