Presenting: Lady Louise, Alice, Elizabeth, Mary

Daily Mail (London), November 27, 2003 | Go to article overview

Presenting: Lady Louise, Alice, Elizabeth, Mary


Byline: COLIN FERNANDEZ

IN naming their baby daughter, the Earl and Countess of Wessex have reached back into the somewhat rebellious side of royal history.

She will be known as Lady Louise Windsor - and her full name officially will be Lady Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary Mountbatten-Windsor.

Her first name was inspired by Princess Louise - a pretty, artistic daughter of Queen Victoria who snubbed royal protocol by marrying a commoner.

Alice is also taken from an unconventional royal. Prince Philip's mother, Princess Alice of Greece, was a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria.

She was born deaf but learned to lip read in English, French, German and Greek while growing up in London. She married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark in 1903.

Elizabeth is in memory of the Queen Mother, and Mary is taken from the Countess's mother Mary Rhys-Jones.

The use of Mountbatten is seen as a victory for Prince Philip, who is said to have been angered in the past that his family surname could not be used by his children because of royal protocol.

When told that Prince Charles would not be allowed to use the surname, he reportedly raged: 'It makes me an amoeba, a bloody amoeba.' The surname can be resurrected because Edward and Sophie have abandoned the HRH title for their daughter.

It has taken the couple 17 days to name the baby after her traumatic birth by emergency Caesarean section at Frimley Park Hospital in Surrey. …

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Presenting: Lady Louise, Alice, Elizabeth, Mary
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