Sleaze, Shame and Clinton's Culture of Corruption; AS ALLEGATIONS OF PERJURY THREATEN THE PRESIDENCY .

Daily Mail (London), January 26, 1998 | Go to article overview

Sleaze, Shame and Clinton's Culture of Corruption; AS ALLEGATIONS OF PERJURY THREATEN THE PRESIDENCY .


Byline: DANIEL JEFFREYS

AMONG many inside the White House and in the people's homes, the mood is the same. Americans are despondent that their President is waist-deep in scandal and may soon be swept away.

Today's Time magazine reports evidence that Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, then 21, engaged in oral sex on more than a dozen occasions over 18 months in a small study off the Oval Office. He insisted oral sex did not constitute adultery.

A U.S. TV news report has said Lewinsky was moved from the White House to the Pentagon with top-secret security clearance because she and the President had been caught having sex. Now it seems the evidence against Clinton is more than circumstantial. Somewhere there is a witness.

All this has produced a growing sense of shame and embarrassment. Many Americans believe Bill Clinton has made a laughing stock of the country, using the White House as his personal 'bachelor pad' and female employees as his harem.

This is not a trivial matter, nor is it an accident. Clinton brought a political mafia from his home state of Arkansas that has been infecting Washington's politics for six years.

The Lewinsky scandal in all its aspects is the by-product of a mafia which sells influence for millions of dollars and avoids immoral acts only if there's more than a 50/50 chance of getting caught.

The President's staff have begun to say privately they feel disgusted and betrayed. They say he is making them feel worse with his latest equivocating admission that he and Lewinsky had a 'close' relationship, based on similar experiences of childhood suffering, but never engaged in sex.

It's a little late for them to back away from their boss.

Since his election they've helped cover up more than half a dozen scandals.

This one may be worse than most but they all have one thing in common - the Clintonites now have a long record of abusing power to hide anything the public might find disgraceful.

The latest statements from Lewinsky's team bring to life an image of the Clinton camp as calculating liars who have been running just ahead of the truth throughout his presidency.

According to Lewinsky's taped conversations with her friend Linda Tripp, Clinton felt he couldn't settle his suit with Paula Jones because 'hundreds' of other women would then come forward.

They would join Arkansas

types such as Jones, whose sexual harassment case helped bring the Lewinsky affair to light, Webster Hubbell, a Clinton best friend now serving a jail term for corruption, James McDougal, who helped set up the Clinton's felonious White-water deal, and a host of Arkansas state employees who were given jobs in Washington when Clinton became President and who are now suspected of having been employed in exchange for their silence.

There are countless aspects of the Lewinsky case which exemplify this Clinton disease, an Arkansas-born complaint that forces the sufferer to do anything necessary to stay in power while indulging any and every appetite behind closed doors.

Clinton used stays in White House bedrooms as gifts for campaign contributors. His Agriculture Secretary, Mike Espy, resigned after a scandal which also led to a million-dollar fine for an Arkansas chicken farmer who helped

finance Clinton's first presidential campaign.

His former Housing Secretary, Henry Cisneros, is fighting criminal charges involving alleged improper use of government funds. …

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