Ex-Presidents Cook Up a Scheme to Get Clinton off the Hook

Daily Mail (London), December 22, 1998 | Go to article overview

Ex-Presidents Cook Up a Scheme to Get Clinton off the Hook


BILL CLINTON went to work in a Washington soup kitchen yesterday as two former presidents tried to save him from the political soup.

Democrat Jimmy Carter and Republican Gerald Ford came up with a deal to allow him to complete his term of office and spare the nation the pain and humiliation of a Senate trial for impeachment.

They said that to save his neck he should admit lying under oath. In return he should receive a guarantee that he would not be arrested and face a criminal court when he leaves office.

Last night there were indications that their bipartisan package, outlined in the New York Times, was at least under consideration although Clinton's defence co-ordinator Gregory Craig declared: 'The notion that he is going to come forward and say he lied is not going to happen.' The two elder statesmen said 'rehashing the lurid evidence' of Clinton's misconduct would only 'exacerbate the jagged divisions that are tearing at our national fabric'.

They added: 'Somehow we must reach a conclusion that most Americans can embrace and that posterity will approve.

'Make no mistake, the judgment of history does matter. And impeachment by the full house has already brought profound disgrace to President Clinton.

Whatever happens in the near future will do little to affect history's judgment of him. …

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Ex-Presidents Cook Up a Scheme to Get Clinton off the Hook
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