Registration of Muslims, Arabs Halted; Homeland Security Ends Immigration Program

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Registration of Muslims, Arabs Halted; Homeland Security Ends Immigration Program


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A federal immigration program targeting men from Middle Eastern countries for mandatory registration was abruptly ended yesterday by the Homeland Security Department.

The National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) had been criticized by Muslims and Arabs for singling out such a limited group, despite the fact that all the hijackers involved in the September 11 attacks were Muslim.

Asa Hutchinson, the Department of Homeland Security's undersecretary for border and transportation security, told reporters that the change was not a response to criticism from civil liberties and minority-advocacy groups.

He said eliminating NSEERS was a first step toward implementing a full entry-exit system called US-VISIT. The system will use biometrics to identify travelers by their right and left index fingerprints, and digital photographs. Personal and travel information also will be collected.

US-VISIT goes online in January at 115 airports and 14 seaports. It is expected to be fully operational by 2005.

"The change will allow us to focus our efforts on the implementation of US-VISIT while preserving our ability to interview some visitors when necessary," Mr. Hutchinson said.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) last December sued the government, claiming immigration authorities unlawfully arrested large numbers of people in Los Angeles as they came forward to comply with the registration requirements.

"Today's announcement will no doubt bring relief to thousands of people who are anxious about being singled out and discriminated against when visiting the United States," said Nihad Awad, CAIR executive director.

NSEERS was created after September 11 and required men 18 and older from 25 countries to be interviewed, fingerprinted and photographed. Nearly 94,000 males were registered at ports of entry into the country, and an additional 83,000 voluntarily registered at federal immigration offices.

Of the approximately 177,000 who registered, 20 percent had overstayed their visas or had other immigration problems, and 11 persons were suspected of having ties to terrorism. A Homeland Security Department spokesman said he had no information on the final outcome of those cases.

Jeanne Butterfield, executive director of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said registration is a "false solution to a real problem and does not make us safer. …

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Registration of Muslims, Arabs Halted; Homeland Security Ends Immigration Program
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