Words of Warning; Teenager Who Died after Taking Ecstasy Wrote Poignant Poem about Drug Fears

Daily Mail (London), September 9, 1997 | Go to article overview

Words of Warning; Teenager Who Died after Taking Ecstasy Wrote Poignant Poem about Drug Fears


Byline: CLIFF RENFREW

ANDREW Woodlock penned a fiercely anti-drugs poem before becoming Britain's youngest Ecstasy victim.

The poem lulled 13-year-old Andrew's mother Phyllis into a false sense of security because she believed her son would never dabble in drugs.

But then she found him semiconscious in woods near their home after he had taken Ecstasy for the first time while with some friends.

The teenager later lost his battle for life in hospital.

Andrew, of Holytown, Lanarkshire, wrote the poem entitled 'Drugs' while a first-year pupil at Taylor High School in New Stevenston.

Mrs Woodlock, 34, who instructed doctors at Monklands Hospital to switch of her son's life support machine after five days, said: 'Whenever I read Andrew's poem I always feel sad because after he wrote it I began to relax about the dangers of drugs around my son.

'I was more concerned about drink than drugs and I still find it hard to understand why he took Ecstasy.

'I had explained to him that the first time he took drugs could be his last and this proved to be true.

'When Andrew was in hospital he said he was sorry and gave me a cuddle and this helped me a lot.

'But I want parents to realise that no matter what their kids promise them they must always watch out for the dangers of drugs.

Andrew knew these dangers but it was curiosity that made him take Ecstasy and that killed my son.

'I still miss him greatly as do his brother and sister. He was not the type to hang around street corners although he had taken alcohol a few times.

Mostly, he used to enjoy listening to records with his pals.

'Andrew was quite a mature boy for his age and used to help me around the house after I split up with his dad Felix. …

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