(1) SCOTTISH PROPERTY (2) National Treasures Worth Rescuing from the Rubble

Daily Mail (London), May 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

(1) SCOTTISH PROPERTY (2) National Treasures Worth Rescuing from the Rubble


Byline: JENNY SHIELDS

A PRINCELY stable block,

Italianate swimming baths, Georgian mansion and a thatched cottage all have something in common - they are some of Scotland's architectural gems in danger of being lost.

Each is listed in the latest Buildings at Risk bulletin from the Scottish Civic Trust which aims to marry would-be restorers with buildings in need of rescue.

According to the trust there are more than 2,000 properties both grand and humble at risk. Conditions vary from fair to ruinous and, although many of the properties are for sale, some owners are stubbornly unwilling to sell.

Among those currently on the market are The Stables at Pitfour, Aberdeenshire. They were designed in 1820 by John Smith, who was also the architect for Pitfour House. An impressive, two storey U-shaped building, the entrance has a large carriage arch, topped with a slender wooden cupola with a domed copper roof.

This B-listed property, which is dilapidated and appears unused, is for sale at offers around [pounds sterling]70,000.

A much more modestly priced property, which again could be turned into a lovely family home, is Auchindoun Mill near Dufftown, Morayshire. This mid 19th-century, L-plan mill was the site of a busy illicit distillery in Edwardian times. The owners are looking for offers of [pounds sterling]12,000.

The Scottish Civic Trust has lots of churches on its books and several manses including one long-abandoned house at Kirkpatrick-Juxta near Beattock, Dumfriesshire. Dating from 1736, or maybe even earlier, this C-listed property is now in a poor state, having been used as a barn for many years.

A classic, two-storey rubble-built house, it has a couple of outbuildings and full planning consent to return it to residential use. The owners seek offers of around [pounds sterling]35,000.

Blackburn House at Livingston is a Georgian house which, despite its poor condition, boasts some fine wood and plaster work and delicate rococo ceilings in two of the principal rooms. Unused and boarded up, it could be transformed into a family home. B-listed, it is open to offers.

SCAR IS an early 19th-century mansion on Sanday in the Orkneys and was once the seat of the Traill family.

This B-listed two-and-a-half storey house, which has a flagstone roof and various wings, is in a fair condition at present, according to the trust, but it is steadily worsening and extensive renovation is required.

Nonetheless, it could make a large and substantial home for someone wanting to live in such a beautiful, though remote, location.

The owners are looking for offers around [pounds sterling]25,000.

Largo House at picturesque Upper Largo in Fife was an important mansion built in 1750 but today it is a roofless shell, yet still has an imposing air about it.

The walled garden, early 19th-century coach house and stables are in a similar sorry state.

However the owner might be prepared to consider selling or leasing the property which stands on an escarpment overlooking the North Sea.

More details of these and other properties can be obtained from the Scottish Civic Trust in Glasgow.

Quality woven deep in valley of lace

THE SOLID, respectable

houses of the Ayrshire valley towns of Newmilns and Darvel are a reminder of an illustrious past.

In the 19th-century textile mills - famed for their decorative lace - flourished and their prosperous owners built comfortable family homes for themselves. …

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