Brains? You Inherit Them from Your Mother

Daily Mail (London), May 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

Brains? You Inherit Them from Your Mother


Byline: DAVID DERBYSHIRE

IT IS a discovery to gladden the hearts and confirm the prejudices of feminists everywhere.

Scientists believe brainy children owe their intelligence to their mothers.

Pioneering research at Cambridge University has found that genes inherited from the maternal side play the dominant role in the development of the thinking part of the brain.

Those from fathers appear to shape the regions associated with primitive instincts, emotions, aggression . . . and eating.

The researchers admit that so far their evidence comes only from a study of mice. But what works in a rodent is often true for humans, they say.

Every child inherits two sets of genes - one from each parent. Most of the time these behave in the same way whichever side they come from.

But a few, known as `imprinted genes', work only if they come from a mother while others are activated only if they are paternal.

Researchers Eric Keverne and Azim Surani injected extra doses of male and female imprinted genes into mice embryos - and were staggered by the results.

Those with added female genes grew bigger brains and smaller bodies.

Embryos with more male genes had huge bodies, but tiny brains, this week's New Scientist magazine reports.

But closer inspection revealed even more important differences.

In the mice given extra female genes, the maternal DNA was clustered in the cortex - the thinking part of the brain which governs intelligence, language and planning.

In the mice with more male genes, the paternal DNA accumulated in the emotional parts of the brain such as the hypothalmus, which control aggression and sex.

This suggests the genetic code from mothers is strongly linked to intelligence - and that from fathers to personality.

It meants women who want super-smart children may be wasting their time visiting a Nobel prizewinners' sperm bank.

They would be better off looking for a well-adjusted and happy male partner who would pass on his personality to their offspring.

Historians say the theory could certainly be true in the case of Albert Einstein.

The physics and maths genius's German-Jewish mother Pauline Koch was the backbone of the family, a shrewd woman with an alert and questioning mind.

His father Hermann, however, was a failure as a businessman.

Einstein left school at 15 with no diploma. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Brains? You Inherit Them from Your Mother
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.