Mexican Artist Finds New Clientele among RP's Art Collectors

Manila Bulletin, December 3, 2003 | Go to article overview

Mexican Artist Finds New Clientele among RP's Art Collectors


THERE are various components involved in the work of art, and the most important are said to be the most obvious.

This is a sentence on conceptual art, and it is nowhere more evident than in Mexicos artistic creations.

Mexican paintings are distinguished both for their mystical propinquity and personal involvement.

Mexico has long been known for its arts and artisans writers, sculptors, ceramists, painters, among others.

Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Javier Zaragoza, Alfredo Guati Rojo, Enrique Velasquez, Raul Anguiano, Leonora Carrington, Javier Vasquez, Alfredo Castaneda, and Alejandro Colunga are only some of the best known artists and artisans that Mexico has produced through history.

And then there is Jorge Palacios.

Palacios art has been characterized by The New York Times as the revival of the details of seventeenth century Italian painters inviting the spectator to rest and value what the planet has gifted, and what man with eagerness for conquest has forgotten.

The well-known art critic Anne Mathews said, being young, he manages to capture with great sensibility the colors of the field portrayed in harmonious form and elegance, pretending to enchant the spectator, for his works love and respect are perceived towards nature

I saw Palacios paintings at the Intercontinental Hotel lobby in Makati City last Sunday, and immediately I knew they were Mexican masterpieces.

But the instant recognition was only because of the inevitable presence of the distinctively decorative talabera in some of the paintings and they were not even the most important elements of most of the 21 paintings.

Palacios art show which ran for two weeks at the Intercon was sponsored by the Mexican Embassy.

The most important element, because they dominate every piece of the exhibit, was the permeation in his art of blooms and wildflowers bird-of-paradise, and the agapanthus of the calla lilies which seems to inspire forever the artists soul to loftier ideals.

In fact, the grass of Parnassus is the muse that tempts his impulses to explore the depth of his craft.

I am the wildflower, he mused, pointing out to me his painting titled El amor es solo para dos, (acrylic on a 45 cm x 60 cm on canvas) while the other is my ladylove leaning towards another flower representing her lover. …

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