You've Tried Atkins, You've Tried Detox. Here's. the Stone Age Diet

The Mirror (London, England), December 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

You've Tried Atkins, You've Tried Detox. Here's. the Stone Age Diet


Byline: PETE SAMSON

WEIGHT-watchers should forget the new-fangled Atkins diet and turn the clock back to the Stone Age, it was suggested yesterday.

The caveman intake of lean meat, fish, vegetable, fruit and nuts could make us all slimmer and healthier, new research indicates.

It certainly seemed to work for Raquel Welch when she starred with John Richardson in the 1966 film One Million Years BC.

Atkins allows its followers as much fat as they want.

The Stone Age way permits only the natural fats found in nuts and fish.

And although the caveman did not live as long as modern man, advocates of his daily dishes say he was taller, stronger and healthier.

It is also argued that the agricultural revolution brought harmful and difficult-to-digest foods such as bread and milk.

Yesterday food allergy therapist Jo Ford enthused about going back to basics and said: "Aspects of the Stone Age diet are very good for you."

Researchers in Liverpool explored the eating habits of two million years ago - and findings indicate their relevance today.

Meat, offal or seafood were 45-65 per cent of the daily diet. Fish, vegetable, leaves, fruit and nuts made up the rest.

Beans, lentils and grains - anything that had to be cooked - were absent, says a report in this month's Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine.

So, of course, were pasta, bread and milk. The foods were rich in natural fat, not saturated - which is a risk of Atkins, through frying.

They were also high in protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals, but low in salt.

Rates of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and heart disease were low in people who kept to the Stone Age style in more recent times. …

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