The Latest Word on Virtual Reality; Good Health

Daily Mail (London), February 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

The Latest Word on Virtual Reality; Good Health


Byline: ANASTASIA STEPHENS

NEW virtual reality technology could allow around 10,000 British people with Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and other disabilities to communicate for the first time.

The revolutionary Gesture Recognition System, developed by Dr Melvyn Curtis at Nottingham University, uses a person's hand, arm or leg movements to instruct computers to write words or `talk'. The equipment, funded by Action Research, also learns to ignore involuntary movement such as the trembling caused by Parkinson's.

Conventional computers need keyboards or joysticks to operate. But the new system, known as the GesRec, uses a series of virtual reality sensors which monitors movement and turns it into speech or text.

The sensors are attached to arms, hands or other parts of the body and learn to recognise distinctive movements. These gestures are then programmed to represent letters, words or sections of the alphabet. In this way, even a person who can only make two basic gestures is able to construct sentences which are written as text or verbalised by the computer.

`The person makes a movement or tries to write a letter in the air and the computer learns to recognise each individual action,' says Dr Curtis.

`Using this, the person can spell out words or select phrases from a pre-prepared menu in the synthesiser.

`The computer only remembers movements that the user wants to be recognised and ignores smaller involuntary gestures.'

The system also has the advantage of allowing people to have their own personalised voice. At the moment most people using speech synthesisers have to make do with an obligatory American accent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Latest Word on Virtual Reality; Good Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.