Early Puberty, Ethnicity May Contribute to Teen Smoking: Parental Monitoring Matters

By Walsh, Nancy | Clinical Psychiatry News, October 2003 | Go to article overview

Early Puberty, Ethnicity May Contribute to Teen Smoking: Parental Monitoring Matters


Walsh, Nancy, Clinical Psychiatry News


TAMPA, FLA. -- Understanding preadolescent expectations about cigarette smoking may offer opportunities to assist teens in lifetime tobacco avoidance.

Youths who smoke typically progress through a sequence of stages, Michiko Otsuki said at a meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development.

First is the anticipatory stage, during which attitudes toward smoking are formed. This stage is followed by one in which the child tries cigarettes, then experiments more frequently. Ultimately, the result is regular use and nicotine dependence, she said.

Of particular concern are early maturing children, who may be vulnerable to risky behaviors and their consequences because of others' assumptions about their maturity. They may be susceptible to social pressures to engage in precocious behaviors, although their cognitive and emotional maturity are inadequate for these demands, said Ms. Otsuki of the University of California, Riverside.

But close parental monitoring of early maturers often can prevent these behaviours, according to findings from a study of 149 fifth-grade students in a medium-sized southern California city.

The study participants were 80 boys and 69 girls whose mean age was 11 years. A total of 42% were of non-Latino whites.

Assessment included pubertal development, parental monitoring, and sociodemographic status. Smoking anticipation was evaluated by asking, "By the time you are 12 years old, what are the chances you will have tried cigarettes, even one or two puffs? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Early Puberty, Ethnicity May Contribute to Teen Smoking: Parental Monitoring Matters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.