BOOKS: Loud Hurrahs for a Man with a Moustache; Boots, Balls & Haircuts, by Hunter Davies, Cassell, Pounds 20. Reviewed by Hyder Jawad

The Birmingham Post (England), December 13, 2003 | Go to article overview

BOOKS: Loud Hurrahs for a Man with a Moustache; Boots, Balls & Haircuts, by Hunter Davies, Cassell, Pounds 20. Reviewed by Hyder Jawad


Byline: Hyder Jawad

For an author who struck gold when he won the rights in the Sixties to write the authorised biography of The Beatles, and silver when he wrote The Glory Game inthe Seventies, Hunter Davies seems to prefer growing old gracefully.

Ambitious efforts of a previous generation have given way to less threatening publications yet he still has the knack of catching the mood to place extraordinary situations into ordinary contexts.

In Boots, Balls & Haircuts he has produced a social history of football that owes its quality as much to lavish illustrations as to his typically ironic prose.

No risks here, but plenty of nostalgia. Davies, the owner of a timeless moustache, takes us from the unheralded formation of the Football Association in 1863 to the outrageous earnings of David Beckham in 2003; from the working-class revolution of the nineteenth century to the middle-class renaissance of modern times.

It is a familiar saga but, unlike many of its genre, tells the story through the eyes of the human being.

Human interest is Davies's forte and he is never better than when he provides laconic, often satirical, character sketches.

'The slowest, dopiest people to realise the fortunes available in football were the football authorities themselves,' he states with perception.'They cut themselves off from most commercial merchandising and advertising possibilities, feeling above such sordid, mercenary worlds, not wanting their pure game, which they perceived as a labour of love, to be tainted by nasty commerce.'

Davies does not tell us the story, he shows us it, and the journey is more enjoyable as a result. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BOOKS: Loud Hurrahs for a Man with a Moustache; Boots, Balls & Haircuts, by Hunter Davies, Cassell, Pounds 20. Reviewed by Hyder Jawad
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.