Legacy Bookshelf

By Lock, Sarah J. | Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, January-June 2003 | Go to article overview

Legacy Bookshelf


Lock, Sarah J., Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers


Below is a selected sampling of current books, articles, and dissertations relevant to the study of American women writers from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. Prices unless otherwise indicated are for hardcover editions.

INDIVIDUAL AUTHORS

ADAMS, ABIGAIL

Gelles, Edith B. Abigail Adams: A Writing Life. New York: Routledge, 2002. 224 pp. $19.95 paper.

ADDAMS, JANE

McMillan, Gloria."Keeping the Conversation Going: Jane Addams' 'A Modern Lear.'" Rhetoric Society Quarterly 32.3 (2002): 61-75.

ALCOTT, LOUISA MAY

Doyle, Christine. Louisa May Alcott and Charlotte Bronte: Transatlantic Translations. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 2000.203 pp. $28.00.

ANTIN, MARY

Butler, Sean. "'Both Joined and Separate': English, Mary Antin, and the Rhetoric of Identification:' MELUS 27.1 (2002): 53-82.

AUSTIN, MARY

Hume, Beverly A. "'Inextricable disordered ranges': Mary Austin's Ecofeminist Explorations in Lost Borders." Studies in Short Fiction 36 (1999): 401-15.

BLY, NELLIE

Lutes, Jean Marie. "Into the Madhouse with Nellie Bly: Girl Stunt Reporting in Late Nineteenth-Century America." American Quarterly 54 (2002): 217-53.

BURR, ESTHER EDWARDS

Harde, Roxanne. "'I don't like strangers on the Sabbath': Theology and Subjectivity in the Journal of Esther Edwards Burr." Legacy 19 (2002): 18-25.

CATHER, WILLA

Chinn, Nancy. "Slavery as Illness: Medicine in Willa Cather's Sapphira and the Slave Girl." Southern Quarterly 40.4 (2002): 68-82.

Hoffman, Karen A. "Identity Crossings and the Autobiographical Act in Willa Cather's My Antonia" Arizona Quarterly 58.4 (2002): 25-50.

Hoover, Sharon, ed. Willa Cather Remembered. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2002. 256 pp. $45.00/$19.95 paper.

Skaggs, Merrill Maguire, ed. Willa Cather's New York: New Essays on Cather in the City. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2001. 318 pp. $47.50.

Stout, Janis P. "Willa Cather's Poetry and the Object(s) of Art:' American Literary Realism 35 (2003): 159-74.

Swift, John N., and Joseph R. Urgo, eds. Willa Cather and the American Southwest. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2002. 192 pp. $40.00.

Trout, Steven. Memorial Fictions: Willa Cather and the First World War. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2002. 224 pp. $40.00.

Williams, Deborah Lindsay. Not in Sisterhood: Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Zona Gale, and the Politics of Female Authorship. New York: Palgrave, 2001. 225 pp. $40.00.

Woidat, Caroline M. "The Indian-Detour in Willa Cather's Southwestern Novels." Twentieth-Century Literature 48 (2001): 22-49.

CERVANTES, LORNA DEE

Rodriguez y Gibson, Eliza."Love, Hunger, and Grace: Loss and Belonging in the Poetry of Lorna Dee Cervantes and Joy Harjo" Legacy 19 (2002): 106-14.

CHESNUT, MARY BOYKIN

Kurant, Wendy. "The Power of Love: The Education of a Domestic Woman in Mary Boykin Chesnut's Two Years." Southern Literary Journal 34.2 (2002): 14-29.

CHILD, LYDIA MARIA

Kenschaft, Lori. Lydia Maria Child: The Quest for Racial Justice. New York: Oxford UP, 2002. 128 pp. $24.00.

CHOPIN, KATE

Bunch, Dianne. "Dangerous Spending Habits: The Epistemology of Edna Pontellier's Extravagant Expenditures in The Awakening." Mississippi Quarterly 55.1 (2001-2002): 43-61.

Disheroon-Green, Suzanne. "Wither Thou Goest, We Will Go: Lovers and Ladies in The Awakening." Southern Quarterly 40.4 (2002): 83-96.

Shaker, Bonnie James. Coloring Locals: Racial Formation in Kate Chopin's Youth Companion Stories. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 2003. 168 pp. $32.95.

Weinstock, Jeffrey Andrew. "In Possession of the Letter: Kate Chopin's 'Her Letters.'" Studies in American Fiction 30.1 (2002): 45-62.

CROUTER, NATALIE

McNeill, Laurie. "'Somewhere Along the Line I Lost Myself': Recreating Self in the War Diaries of Natalie Crouter and Elizabeth Vaughan" Legacy 19 (2002): 98-105. …

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