It's the Election, Stupid . . . Abuse of Statistics

Daily Mail (London), October 24, 1996 | Go to article overview

It's the Election, Stupid . . . Abuse of Statistics


IF the chimes of Big Ben punctuated the pageantry for the State Opening of Parliament, it was the ticking of the electoral clock which dictated the contents of the Queen's Speech.

The Prime Minister's strategy now is to point up the differences between the real Tory Party and the pale imitation led by Tony Blair. How provoking for him, then, that yesterday afternoon he was ambushed into consensus politics by Labour and Liberal Democrat offers of support for government action to target paedophiles and stalkers which would otherwise have been consigned to the lottery of private members Bills.

In the main, however, the brief legislative programme John Major outlined was deliberately designed to accentuate a hopefully desirable cleavage between Government and Opposition in the countdown to next year's General Election.

As so often, law and order is the main battleground, with the Scottish and Home Secretaries sustaining their commendable offensive against crime.

Bills are promised to introduce stern minimum sentences for inveterate burglars and drug dealers and mandatary life sentences for those convicted a second time for serious violent crimes.

The idea is to put Labour on the spot. Do they want criminals locked up for longer or not ?

And if it also provokes a judicial backlash in the Lords, then the strategists in Conservative Central Office will surely be delighted.

There is no reason why the Tories should not appropriate the traditional radical cry of `Peers versus People', which could still have some popular appeal.

But in this almost unendurably protracted electoral campaign, the Bills in the Queen's Speech are only a sideshow. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It's the Election, Stupid . . . Abuse of Statistics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.