American Society on Aging

By Dooley, Erin E. | Environmental Health Perspectives, November 2003 | Go to article overview

American Society on Aging


Dooley, Erin E., Environmental Health Perspectives


The American Society on Aging (ASA) is a nonprofit organization working to strengthen the skills and knowledge of professionals who work with older adults. Since its founding in 1954, its membership has grown to 6,000, with scientists, health care practitioners, policy makers, and businesspeople among the professionals in its ranks. On its website, located at http://www.asaging.org/, the ASA provides access to its program information and educational materials, many of which are available for free to nonmembers.

The ASA sponsors a number of meetings and educational conferences for both elders and those who work with them. The annual ASA-National Council on the Aging joint meeting brings together thousands of professionals to share information on new research findings. Also conducted annually is the Summer Series on Aging, a series of intensive multidisciplinary training sessions held around the United States that address issues including psychopharmacology and aging, and diversity in the aging population. Throughout the year, the ASA conducts web-based multimedia seminars, some of which are recorded and can be accessed on the website at any time.

One of ASA's special projects, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is titled Live Well, Live Long: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Older Adults. From the main project page, accessible by opening the Resources pulldown menu and choosing Health Promotion, visitors can access three stand-alone modules: Blueprint for Health Promotion, Strategies for Cognitive Vitality, and Optimal Medication Use. This project has been developed to help professionals build knowledge of the specific health and social service needs of our diverse aging population, and each module offers strategies for health promotion that are relatively inexpensive to implement. For example, the modules present step-by-step lists for activities such as organizing a community consortium and planning presentations on health topics of interest to elders. …

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