Merry Christmas

By Gilmour, Peter | U.S. Catholic, December 2003 | Go to article overview

Merry Christmas


Gilmour, Peter, U.S. Catholic


We approach these holidays painfully aware that rumors of war turned into realities of war this year, and peace prospects turned into purloined promises. Too many grinches stealing Christmas. Let's reverse the trends.

Merry Christmas to the 31 newly appointed cardinals, especially the sole American, Justin Rigali, who never became a St. Louis Cardinal. Vote well when the time comes.

Merry Christmas to the Boston Red Sox and the Chicago Cubs, first in the hearts of many baseball fans.

To all the people of Boston and their new archbishop, Sean Patrick O'Malley, and to the people of Palm Beach, Florida and their new bishop, Gerald M. Barbarito, merry Christmas.

Merry Christmas to all who reached silver anniversaries this year, especially Pope John Paul II.

Merry Christmas to George W. Bush, Donald Rumsfeld, Condoleezza Rice, John Ashcroft, and all who are so sure. Must be nice to have all the answers. Remember Newt Gingrich?

To James Carroll, whose new novel Secret Father is a mystery of maturity and a mature mystery, merry Christmas.

Merry Christmas to the 163 Milwaukee priests whose August 18 letter encourages optional celibacy for the priesthood. Nice epistle.

To the National Pastoral Life Center as they search for a new director and to all who benefited from the late Philip Murnion's leadership for many years, merry Christmas.

To the people of Afghanistan and Iraq, waiting for the promised land, merry Christmas. …

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