A PAIN IN THE NECK; BRAM STOKER: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE AUTHOR OF DRACULA by Barbara Belford (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, [Pounds Sterling]25)

Daily Mail (London), May 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

A PAIN IN THE NECK; BRAM STOKER: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE AUTHOR OF DRACULA by Barbara Belford (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, [Pounds Sterling]25)


Byline: RHODA KOENIG

WE MAY know little about the life and other works of Victorian author Bram Stoker, but we certainly know him as the creator of Dracula - that novel, as Barbara Belford puts it, of `seduction, rape, gang rape, group sex, necrophilia, paedophilia, incest, adultery, oral sex, venereal disease, and voyeurism,' as well as `the emergence of the New Woman' - a creature more frightening to men than any vampire.

Belford's biography presents colourful background material and astute psychological criticism. Yet, though he is nominally the hero of this drama, Stoker recedes into the wings as more exciting characters take the stage.

A Protestant Irishman, Stoker grew up near Dublin, went to Trinity College, and became, like his father, a civil servant. But it was his night job that absorbed his interest and changed his life.

In 1871, indignant that a great theatre performance he had seen received no mention in the Press, he complained to the Dublin Evening Mail and was given the chance to write unpaid, unsigned reviews. Five years later, the actor Stoker had championed returned to Dublin to play Hamlet, and this time no one was unaware of his name . . . Henry Irving. The great tragedian, appreciative of Stoker's intelligent and sympathetic review, invited him to dine, beginning a friendship that led to Stoker moving to London and becoming his business manager at the Lyceum Theatre for 27 years.

Belford brings alive the world presided over by the grandiose, impulsive, and disorganised Irving. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A PAIN IN THE NECK; BRAM STOKER: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE AUTHOR OF DRACULA by Barbara Belford (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, [Pounds Sterling]25)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.