Waiting for Oskar; Steven Spielberg: The Unauthorised Biography by John Baxter (Harper Collins, [Pounds Sterling]18.00)

Daily Mail (London), May 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

Waiting for Oskar; Steven Spielberg: The Unauthorised Biography by John Baxter (Harper Collins, [Pounds Sterling]18.00)


Byline: Quentin Falk

AS DIRECTOR of five of the ten most successful box-office films of all time, and now co-owner of Hollywood's newest and potentially most powerful movie studio, Dreamworks, Steven Spielberg is, in his 50th year, perhaps the ultimate `player'.

Yet the fame and unimaginable fortune that constantly attend the film-maker of blockbusters like Jurassic Park, E.T., Jaws and the Indiana Jones trilogy, certainly don't seem to have helped him win many friends beyond his close coterie and, of course, those anonymous millions who have gleefully flocked to his movies for more than 20 years.

Until he deservedly, though very belatedly, scooped the Oscars with Schindler's List in 1994, Spielberg's sole Academy prize had been almost a decade earlier when, aged just 37, he won The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for `outstanding motion picture production'.

This honorary trophy is normally reserved for producers, directors and entrepreneurs in the twilight of their years. Spielberg may have detected some irony in the fact that the man after whom the award is named was, rather like him, a visionary but of an altogether earlier era who died in his mid-30s while still at the height of his powers.

Up to Schindler's List, Spielberg jointly held the unenviable record for earning the most Oscar nominations without scooping a single statuette, for his careful adaptation of The Color Purple.

Until the Academy did the right thing, the suspicion lurked that Spielberg was the victim of his own avowed populism and that he was, his peers perhaps reasoned, simply too successful for his own good. And he certainly gets no respite from the author of this readable, though note this well, unauthorised biography.

Close Encounters of The Third Kind in 1978 `marked,' suggests Baxter, `the beginning of his decline as an artist'. Today, he comments rather callously, Spielberg has nothing left to prove, and should perhaps opt for `honourable retirement and acceptance of his role as icon of the mass market'. As if this terse write-off wasn't enough, Spielberg is also bracketed with those fictional failures-in-success, Jay Gatsby and Charles Foster Kane. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Waiting for Oskar; Steven Spielberg: The Unauthorised Biography by John Baxter (Harper Collins, [Pounds Sterling]18.00)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.