FOURTH FORM CRAZY ON LSD; `It Could Have Led to Tragedy'

Daily Mail (London), February 3, 1996 | Go to article overview

FOURTH FORM CRAZY ON LSD; `It Could Have Led to Tragedy'


Byline: JAMES GOLDEN

HORRIFIED teachers uncovered a playground drugs market after almost an entire class began behaving strangely.

Police believe more than 20 teenagers, mostly girls aged 14 and 15, were involved in the LSD ring.

The mind-altering drug was being sold by a group of boys, three of them in the same class.

Other boys had tried to protect the girls and there had been fights at school between them and the pushers.

Now three 14-year-old boys have been expelled from 940-pupil King Charles I Comprehensive in Kidderminster, Hereford and Worcester, and could face charges of supplying the drug. It was sold in blotting paper `tabs' at [pounds sterling]3 a time.

The boys have been released on police bail along with another youth, a jobless local 16-year-old.

Fourteen girls, all found in possession of the drug or under its influence, have also been interviewed by police and their parents advised to seek medical advice. All are in Year 10, the modern equivalent of the old fourth form.

Police praised the county drug awareness programme which had helped teachers spot the symptoms of LSD, a drug which can produce major character changes, paranoia and depression attacks.

One officer said: `The consequences could have been devastating.

Fortunately no-one suffered any damage thanks to the school's swift action.'

Inspector Andy MacKillop of West Mercia police said: `It appears some of the children had actually taken the drug in school, particularly at break time.

`Basically there had been behavioural problems at the end of last term, before Christmas, with some pupils acting out of character.

`A number of pupils were excluded, but when the new term began the problems reappeared.'

Some of the disruptive teenagers were questioned by concerned teachers and admitted having taken LSD. …

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