Like No Other Industry on Earth

By Fergeson, C. Kendric | ABA Banking Journal, December 2003 | Go to article overview

Like No Other Industry on Earth


Fergeson, C. Kendric, ABA Banking Journal


YEAR IN AND YEAR OUT, IN BIG WAYS and small, America's bankers contribute to their communities. As I will point out throughout my year in office, bankers enrich the lives of their neighbors in many ways. Here are some examples.

Annapolis Bank & Trust Co.

History plays an important role in Annapolis, Md., which became Maryland's capital in 1695. The State House is the oldest state capitol building still in continuous legislative use, and Annapolis' U.S. Naval Academy was founded in 1845.

To increase awareness of this history, the Annapolis Department of Transportation published a book to make exploration of the city an enjoyable experience. Annapolis Bank & Trust helped fund "My Annapolis Adventure: Passport to Discovery," which features 18 historic and educational sites around the city. Children answer questions in the book and conduct scavenger hunts. The books are free thanks, in part, to the involvement of Robert Henel, Jr., CEO of Annapolis Bank, who serves on ABA's Community Bankers Council.

Maybe there's some untapped history in your community waiting to be discovered.

Central Bank of Kansas City

Chartered in 1950, Central Bank of Kansas City, Kan., serves the ethnically diverse community of Northeast Kansas City.

Central Bank is both a Community Development Financial Institution and a Community Development Entity, according to CEO Bill Dana, a member of ABA's Communications and Community Bankers Councils. The minority-owned bank's projects range from partnering with a community development corporation to constructing 30 new homes for low- and moderate-income families to working to improve historic streetscapes and rehabilitate older housing. …

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