Arms Trafficking Danger; U.S. Should Join U.N. Effort against It

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 29, 2003 | Go to article overview

Arms Trafficking Danger; U.S. Should Join U.N. Effort against It


Byline: Loretta Bondi, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Revelations on Iran's arms procurement, and on the extent of Libya's secret weapons program, have recently exposed illicit arms-trafficking pipelines stretching across the Middle East, Europe and South Asia. In the United States' own hemispheric neighborhood, an Organization of American States investigation linked an arms transaction between Nicaragua and Panama to brokers catering to the "Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia," a terrorist group by OAS definition. Significantly, one of the middlemen in this transaction was also connected to a Lebanese operator detained in Europe and under investigation by several nations for his ties with al Qaeda and suspected role in attacks on U.S. embassies in East Africa.

Moreover, a December 2003 United Nations report on the implementation of sanctions against al Qaeda underlined the role of middlemen moving weapons and money on behalf of terrorists. The U.N. investigators noted the growing need for an international treaty to control arms brokering and sanction-busting. Yet the United States has been adamantly opposed to such a treaty and to the creation of a U.N. specialized unit that could keep track of and "blacklist" traffickers across the world and their unsavory clients.

Since the 1990s, investigations have exposed well-honed arms smuggling pipelines and networks operated by globe-trotting brokers, transport agents, dealers and assorted facilitators. Whatever the fate of the ultimate paymasters of covert arms deals, the supporting cast of middlemen and peddlers has remained largely unscathed and outside the reach of the law.

Unlike arms manufacturers, dealers and exporters, brokers are uniquely unregulated. This is because only 16 countries in the world have laws that specifically target and hold accountable those middlemen who have consistently made a mockery of sanctions and arms trade controls.

Scant oversight, combined with governments' ineptitude or reluctance to bust illegal operators, has allowed arms peddlers to circumvent even the limited controls that already exist. For example, brokers have long been able to avoid accountability by establishing their bases in countries with extremely lax export laws. They are skilled at using fraudulent shipping documents and clandestine transport routes, such as off-the-beaten-track airstrips, roads and seaports. They are also masters in greasing their way with corrupt officials.

Shadowy as they might appear, arms middlemen have left detectable traces in their wake and seem to constitute a steady cast of characters. Indeed, some of the most notorious brokers have become "household names" in investigative circles. But the international community has been slow to react. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Arms Trafficking Danger; U.S. Should Join U.N. Effort against It
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.