NO SHELTER; ASYLUM SEEKERS OUT IN COLD EXCLUSIVE Scotland's Borders Closed to Refugees as Councils Go Back on Promises to House 1500

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), January 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

NO SHELTER; ASYLUM SEEKERS OUT IN COLD EXCLUSIVE Scotland's Borders Closed to Refugees as Councils Go Back on Promises to House 1500


Byline: By NORMAN SILVESTER

SCOTLAND has closed its borders to asylum seekers after eight councils refused to give them homes.

The local authorities abandoned pledges to offer shelter to 1500 refugees as part of a government drive to move them out of London.

The councils pulled out after claiming the refugees earmarked for their areas did not match strict conditions laid down about nationality and numbers.

Glasgow is the only one of Scotland's 32 local authorities to fulfil its promise to support refugees as part of the National Asylum Support Service's dispersal programme.

The city already houses the majority of the 12,000 asylum seekers mainly from the Balkans, Africa and the Middle East who live north of the Border.

But East Renfrewshire, Fife, Edinburgh, North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire and Perth and Kinross councils have refused to take in refugees despite previously agreeing to do so.

The councils' backtracking means the only place where new asylum seekers can go in Scotland is the controversial Dungavel detention centre in Lanarkshire.

It is being expanded by 25 per cent and a new 44-bed unit is to be created at the secure site where asylum seekers, including children, are held while their final appeals are heard.

The holding of families and children at the unit has been fiercely criticised by campaigners.

Last week, West Dunbartonshire became the latest authority to refuse more refugees, even though they had told NASS they would offer housing and support to 150 asylum seekers.

The council claimed that NASS were unable to supply the right ``kind'' of refugee. They particularly wanted refugees who all spoke the same language or came from the same country, to cut down on translation costs.

Tim Huntingford, chief executive of West Dunbartonshire, said he regretted the council had pulled out of negotiations with NASS. He blamed the Government for changing the criteria on which refugees would be moved to the area.

He said: ``NASS made it clear that they are unwilling to agree to a contract with West Dunbartonshire Council on the basis of previous negotiations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NO SHELTER; ASYLUM SEEKERS OUT IN COLD EXCLUSIVE Scotland's Borders Closed to Refugees as Councils Go Back on Promises to House 1500
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.