Does Our President Understand the Concept of Guerrilla Warfare?

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 4, 2004 | Go to article overview

Does Our President Understand the Concept of Guerrilla Warfare?


Byline: Jack Mabley

First lady Laura Bush is a librarian. She should be familiar with books on guerrilla warfare.

There is little evidence that her husband reads books. He gets the news from Condoleezza Rice or Karl Rove, with occasional looks at the Fox News Channel.

One wonders if Laura Bush feels a need to acquaint her husband with the reality of guerrilla warfare.

Since before the time of Christ, history tells of bands of a few thousand guerrillas defeating the most powerful armies. Recent examples are the United States in Vietnam and the French in Algeria.

The strategy is simplicity itself. The powerful army can't take initiative. It can only react.

The guerrillas work in shadows, detect vulnerable spots in the army, strike and vanish back into the darkness.

That's exactly what is happening now in Bush's foolhardy war in Iraq. It's a lose-lose proposition for Bush and his warhawk, Paul Wolfowitz. The sooner we get out of Iraq the better, because the future there is hopeless for us.

I wonder how Laura Bush addresses the commander-in-chief. She properly refers to him in the third person as the President.

In private, does she call him George, or have an unpublished nickname? He's known for creating nicknames of friends, like "Kenny-Boy" Lay for the former head of Enron.

Recently, I called the Glenview State Bank branch in Arlington Heights to leave a voice mail with my change of address.

They don't have voice mail. A very pleasant woman answered the phone.

"What in the world are you doing up at this hour?" I asked.

"I've been here all night," came the reply.

This is a message of cheer and hope for people who detest those "punch 1 . …

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