Intellectuals and the Presidency

Manila Bulletin, January 10, 2004 | Go to article overview

Intellectuals and the Presidency


DO intellectuals make good presidents of a country? Does high education ensure a presidents effective governance and national progress?

The book Intellectuals and the American Presidency: Philosophers, Jesters or Technicians tackles the role of intellectuals in the American presidency, from John F. Kennedy Jr. to Bill Clinton. Author Trevi Troy asserts that presidents need not be intellectuals, but should take ideadriven people seriously.

Notable among American intellectuals who had helped bridge the presidency and the people was Arthur Schlesinger Jr. who strengthened President Kennedys ties with the burgeoning artistic and intellectual community of the 1960s. Another is economist Martin Anderson who put together for President Reagan an impressive think tank for his domestic agenda.

Gerald Ford, who assumed the presidency after Richard Nixons resignation, hired political scientist Bob Goldwin who conducted idea seminars with top scholars. Although he lost in the 1976 election bid, Ford helped hold the country together during a very difficult period.

Bill Clinton loved having dinners and bull sessions with intellectuals. Faced later on by an impeachment case and possible removal from the White House, a group of 412 historians placed a full-page ad in the New York Times to defend him, arguing that the charges were not grounds for impeachment.

On the other hand, Jimmy Carter who had one of the highest IQ among American presidents in the last century, refused to reach out to the intellectuals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Intellectuals and the Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.