`Unborn' See the World as It Truly Is

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

`Unborn' See the World as It Truly Is


Byline: FROM HEART TO HEART By Rev. Oswin Hollenbeck For The Register-Guard

More than 2,500 years ago in northern India, Shakyamuni Buddha, the Awakened One, taught that "there is an unborn, undying, unchanging, uncreated."

This "unborn" or "unconditioned" are words some Buddhists use to point to the "something" that is greater than the universe and yet flows through every particle of it, including each of us. Within every being exists an intuitive knowledge of our unborn Buddha nature, and serene reflection meditation is one way to open our hearts to this True Life. All can become as Buddha and realize nirvana - the ultimate awakening to eternal peace and joy.

This meditation tradition, also known as Soto Zen, was called "peasant zen" in Japan, because it was simple enough for anyone to practice. It does not require intellectual knowledge, historical background, doctrinal beliefs or expertise in esoteric ritual. The essential aspects are to sit still with an open and trusting heart, see the world as it truly is, and make the necessary changes within ourselves to live at peace in accord with our true nature.

In this stillness we allow our sense of a separate self with its thoughts, judgments, feelings and memories to arise and pass away. All of these are transformed through meditation practice, and we come to know and live from something deeper, more reliable, bright and universal. Buddhists calls this the Buddha refuge.

In daily life, a Buddhist endeavors to harmonize his or her activities with the Buddhist precepts. Peace of heart does not blossom unless we develop a compassionate and responsible orientation to all life. …

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