THE HELL BELOW; Revealed at Last I the Aerial Pictures That Show the True Horror of the Second World War

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), January 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

THE HELL BELOW; Revealed at Last I the Aerial Pictures That Show the True Horror of the Second World War


Byline: By Tom Newton Dunn

THEY are an astonishing record of the most heroic, nerve-racking and ghastly moments of World War Two.

These birdOs eye views of battlefields and Nazi occupied Western Europe are published for the first time today.

Until now, almost all of the aerial reconnaissance pictures taken by daring RAF pilots behind enemy lines during World War Two have never been seen outside a tiny top secret circle. But after more than 60 years

collecting dust behind locked doors, the five million once highly classified snaps will be available for all to view on a new official internet site, www.evidenceincamera.co.uk, launched this Monday.

Perhaps the singularly most important aerial snap taken during the war was of the legendary German battleship, the Bismarck.

The lone flier, Pilot Officer Suckling, found the enormous hulk and her three support vessels following behind, lurking off the coast of Norway on May 21, 1941. With the Royal NavyOs fleet alerted, the Bismarck had been sunk within seven days of the snap being taken, giving a massive and much- needed morale boost to Britain and her beleaguered troops. Some of the bravest pilots Britain had were tasked with the ultra- risky job of low level reconnaissance flying over enemy-held territory.

All had to grapple with the tortuous dilemma that the lower they flew, the better the picture would be, but the more chance there was of them being shot down.

Pilot Officer Suckling, for example, was killed on a mission in June 1941, less than a month after he found the Bismarck. One of the few people allowed into the National Archives, in Kew, where the grainy black and white images have been stored, was Hollywood director Steven Spielberg.

He was given special access to research the TV series Band Of Brothers and his Oscar- winning war film Saving Private Ryan.

The blood and chaos of battle as it unfolds is also captured vividly by the air aces, as the photographs taken on D-Day prove. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE HELL BELOW; Revealed at Last I the Aerial Pictures That Show the True Horror of the Second World War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.