European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 3, December 2003

The Review of Metaphysics, December 2003 | Go to article overview

European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 3, December 2003


Nietzsche, Re-Evaluation and the Turn to Genealogy, DAVID OWEN

This article provides a developmental account of the reasons for Nietzsche's turn to genealogy as a mode of enquiry and, thereby, an interpretive basis for understanding the philosophical function of his genealogy of morality. It begins by identifying three central problems that Nietzsche comes to recognize concerning his initial understanding of the nature and demands of the project of reevaluation in Daybreak. The first problem concerns the relationship between religious and moral belief in his contemporaries and what Nietzsche takes to be their failure to infer the loss of authority of moral beliefs despite their acknowledgment of the loss of authority of religious beliefs. The second arises in relation to the need to provide a naturalistic account of our unconditional will to truth that will ground Nietzsche's appeal to this value. The third concerns the problem of authority for the project of reevaluation and addresses, in the context of Nietzsche's perspectivism, his need to provide reasons that his audience can accept to reject the perspective of Christian morality. Nietzsche's responses to these problems, the author argues, provide him with both compelling reasons to develop the mode of enquiry exhibited in On the Genealogy of Morality and the conceptual resources necessary to do so. The essay concludes by indicating the challenge that this account offers to the interpretations of genealogy offered by major commentators such as Leiter, Geuss, and Ridley.

McDowell on Reasons, Externalism and Scepticism, DUNCAN PRITCHARD

For the most part, the conventional wisdom in the recent literature has been that content externalism is only suited to dealing with, at best, a small set of skeptical arguments concerning our knowledge of the external world. One prominent dissenting voice to this conventional wisdom, however, has been John McDowell who has provocatively claimed that external world skepticism essentially rests upon a commitment to content internalism. Drawing upon ideas from Wittgenstein's "On Certainty," a critical assessment of McDowell's response to skepticism and, in particular, the role that he accords to reasons in this regard is presented. It is concluded that there is nothing in the McDowellian account which should cause us to reject the conventional wisdom about the relationship between content externalism and skepticism.

Hegel and Peircean Abduction, PAUL REDDING

"Abduction" was the term Charles Sanders Peirce used in his later writings for a type of inference that is now commonly called "inference to the best explanation." According to Peirce, abduction stood alongside induction as a distinct form of nondemonstrative or probabilistic inference, and constituted a methodologically distinct step in scientific investigation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 3, December 2003
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.