Abortion Foes Battle on; Pro-Life Sentiment Growing

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 21, 2004 | Go to article overview

Abortion Foes Battle on; Pro-Life Sentiment Growing


Byline: Cheryl Wetzstein, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The American public appears to be turning away from support for abortion on demand, but the issue promises to be a political, legislative and cultural battleground again this election year. "There is growing pro-life sentiment, particularly among the younger age cohorts," said Douglas Johnson, legislative director of the National Right to Life Committee.

For example, in November a Gallup poll of more than 500 teens found that 72 percent saw abortion as "morally wrong" instead of "morally acceptable." And last summer, the Center for the Advancement of Women, a pro-choice organization, said from 2001 to 2003, surveys showed that women increasingly wanted more restrictions on abortion.

That trend has stirred both pro-life and pro-choice groups, which this week will mark the 31st anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, the Supreme Court decision that struck down state laws against abortion.

The debate over partial-birth abortion undoubtedly changed some attitudes, said Mr. Johnson, because it educated the public about what he called the "brutal realities" of abortion. President Bush's Nov. 5 signing of legislation banning partial-birth abortion, he added, was a major pro-life milestone and marked the "first federal ban on a method of abortion since Roe v. Wade."

The partial-birth law currently is blocked by three federal lawsuits, and pro-choice groups are mounting an aggressive defense, including a march on Washington and a campaign to recruit supporters from the next generation of women.

"We are at a crossroads," NARAL Pro-Choice America said in the statement. The group is one of the sponsors of the April 25 March for Women's Lives, billed as the largest pro-choice rally since 1992.

"Only a powerful, grass-roots, pro-choice movement can stop [pro-life policy-makers] from taking away our freedom. It's our choice, and this is our moment," said NARAL Pro-Choice, which also has launched Generation Pro-Choice to attract young pro-choice women.

This year's presidential election is vitally important to the abortion issue, both sides say.

If President Bush is re-elected and gets to appoint at least two new Supreme Court justices, "it could mean the end of reproductive privacy and the end of Roe v. Wade," said Kate Michelman, former president of NARAL Pro-Choice.

The upcoming election is "the most important in my lifetime," she said recently at the National Press Club. "We put a pro-choice president in the White House [with President Clinton], ... and we can do it again."

Mr. Johnson also sees the 2004 election as critical because in a few years, the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to address the challenges to the partial-birth ban.

It will take just a one-vote change on the court to uphold the ban, he says, so "it's not far-fetched to think that the outcome of the partial-birth law may rest on this election."

Other key battles this year are likely to include "emergency contraception" and "fetal rights."

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to decide this spring whether Plan B, a high-dose birth-control-pill product, can be sold over the counter as emergency contraception. Plan B interrupts or blocks a pregnancy if taken within 72 hours of intercourse.

Pro-choice groups, who say easy access to emergency contraception dramatically will reduce unwanted pregnancies and abortions, are pleased that influential panels have recommended that the FDA approve over-the-counter status for Plan B. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Abortion Foes Battle on; Pro-Life Sentiment Growing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.