Faith Healing; It's Not a Drug or a New Surgical Technique, but Some Doctors Believe It Could Help to Improve Your Health. We Investigate Whether Prayer Really Does Have the Power to Heal

The Mirror (London, England), January 22, 2004 | Go to article overview

Faith Healing; It's Not a Drug or a New Surgical Technique, but Some Doctors Believe It Could Help to Improve Your Health. We Investigate Whether Prayer Really Does Have the Power to Heal


Byline: CHRISTINE MORGAN

IN THE not-too-distant future, patients may receive more than drugs to help them recover from life-saving heart surgery.

If studies to be carried out shortly in 20 American hospitals are successful, patients in intensive care units may also be prayed for by people who don't even know them.

Research already shows that patients with heart disease may suffer fewer complications and need fewer drugs to help them get better when they are prayed for, compared to those who don't get prayers said in their names.

If new studies into prayer and healing go to plan, they could change the way some cardiac units are run, according to neuropsychiatrist Dr Peter Fenwick of the Institute of Psychiatry at London University.

Dr Fenwick presented a paper analysing several existing studies on prayer and healing at last year's British Association Festival of Science.

He became interested in the idea that prayer could help to heal after being involved in studies on the effect meditation has on the brain.

"There have now been more than seven randomised, controlled trials of intercessory prayer - that is, praying for somebody from a distance," he says.

"Some of these have shown that patients who are unaware they're being prayed for and are in hospital - either with heart disease or having infertility treatment - can be significantly helped by prayer."

Heart disease

THE first scientifically-controlled study of intercessory prayer was carried out in 1985 at San Francisco General Hospital.

Almost 400 patients agreed to take part in the trial, though none of them knew whether or not they would be prayed for.

Half were prayed for by a group of strangers, while the other half received no prayers.

Amazingly, the prayed-for patients recovered more easily and left hospital earlier than the group that wasn't prayed for.

"That study really set the cat among the pigeons," says Dr Fenwick - who confesses, like many others, that he only goes to church once a year.

"It's difficult to argue that prayer wasn't having some effect because the trial was so well done.

"If they'd been testing a drug, and not prayer, that drug would have been proclaimed highly effective."

Infertility

A MORE recent study, which took place in Columbia University, New York, in 2001, is even more startling.

It involved people in Australia, Canada and America saying prayers for a group of Korean couples having IVF treatment in Seoul. Again, half the group were prayed for while the other half was not. The prayed-for

patients turned out to have double the embryo implantation rate, as well as double the pregnancy rate, compared to others who didn't receive prayers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Faith Healing; It's Not a Drug or a New Surgical Technique, but Some Doctors Believe It Could Help to Improve Your Health. We Investigate Whether Prayer Really Does Have the Power to Heal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.