Fancy 'The Crackpots' from Synetic; Dancing, Mime Aid Comedic Portrayals

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 23, 2004 | Go to article overview

Fancy 'The Crackpots' from Synetic; Dancing, Mime Aid Comedic Portrayals


Byline: Jayne Blanchard, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Winter's icy streets and whipping winds make lummoxes of us all, but you'll really feel like a clodhopper after taking in the arrowy grace of the performers in Synetic Theater's production of "The Crackpots," a world premiere stage adaptation of the 1973 Soviet film, "Sherekelebi."

Using balletic movement and mime techniques, the supple cast seems to effortlessly portray everything from farm crops to chickens and a cinematic array of human characters. Their movements are so cleanly etched and precise that dialogue sometimes seems superfluous.

"The Crackpots" is written and directed by renowned Georgian director Rezo Gabriadze and is a fantastical allegory about liberation and realizing your dreams - no matter how absurd they may seem. When the movie was made, it carried a political message about personal freedom that peeped through the crazy antics and double entendres.

It is a picaresque tale of a young man, Ertaoz (Greg Marzullo), a bumpkin in a polka-dot shirt, whose life goes from idyllic to difficult after the death of his father. Determined to repay his father's numerous debts, Ertaoz travels to the big city. He promptly falls in love with the delectably flirty Margarita (Catherine Gasta), who is happily married but still not above whooping it up with the men seeking her favors. One of the enamored is Khura (Irakli Kavsadze), the police chief, whose goose-stepping and widely mustachioed goofy grin is a silent movie in itself - one conceivably starring Charlie Chaplin.

Khura may be a comic figure, but he is dead serious about Margarita. When Ertaoz's proclamations of love land him in prison, he meets fellow inmate Kristefore (Paata Tsikurishvili), who is serving a 48-year sentence for the same crime of adoring a beautiful woman. The philosophical scientist has used his time wisely - inventing a "giant hen" that flies.

The two men escape prison, only to be recaptured by a local doctor (Nathan Weinberger), who places them in an asylum where he can better study their insanity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fancy 'The Crackpots' from Synetic; Dancing, Mime Aid Comedic Portrayals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.