Palace Servant's Letters to Ian Brady

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), January 25, 2004 | Go to article overview

Palace Servant's Letters to Ian Brady


A ROYAL servant who helps prepare the Queen's meals has developed a disturbing obsession with Britain's worst serial killers, The Mail on Sunday has learned.

Thomas Ewen, 23, who lives in staff quarters at Buckingham Palace and works in the Royal kitchen, has engaged in lengthy correspondence with Moors Murderer Ian Brady, Dennis Nilsen, who killed 12 men, and Colin Ireland, who was jailed in 1993 for the murder of five homosexuals.

It is understood that Ewen also tried to visit child killer Robert Black, the predatory sex offender By Ian Gallagher CHIEF REPORTER who was given ten life sentences for murdering three young girls.

And he tried to buy a stone from the Gloucester home of mass murderer Fred West, as well as writing to one-legged killer Michael Sams, who was jailed in 1993 for the murder of Julie Dart and the abduction of estate agent Stephanie Slater.

'It seemed he was intent on forming relationships with these people,' a former associate said. 'Thomas is a strange young man, a loner, and I found the depth of his interest in them troubling.' Brady sent Ewen a signed photograph and Christmas card and Nilsen gave him an abstract painting with 'Thomas' scrawled all over it.

But at one stage in their bizarre penpal relationship it seemed even Nilsen, 57, who butchered his victims and boiled their body parts, was beginning to question the kitchen worker's fixation. …

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