5 Signs That It's Time to Change Jobs; Psychology Have You Stayed Too Long? Dr Raj Persaud, Consultant Psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital, Says There May Be Subtle Signs That It's Time to Move On

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

5 Signs That It's Time to Change Jobs; Psychology Have You Stayed Too Long? Dr Raj Persaud, Consultant Psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital, Says There May Be Subtle Signs That It's Time to Move On


Byline: Raj Persaud

MOST of us are psychologically very conservative when it comes to changing jobs.

We prefer the security of staying put to the unknown hazards of a new workplace.

We tell ourselves that if things are bad here, they are probably just as terrible everywhere else. Or we hope things are going to get better soon - and so we linger on in dead-end jobs long past their sell-by date.

But this refusal to move on is fraught with danger. If we are no longer enjoying our work or developing our careers, we could be heading for burnout.

And as we stagnate, we gradually slip behind in the race for career advancement.

So how can you tell when it's time to change jobs?

1. You become ill more often Have you started taking time off at the first sign of a cold, such as a little sniffle or sneeze? Does the merest hint of bad weather make you call in with an excuse? Most people who like their work turn up relentlessly, and never leave early.

2. You take the easy option Avoidance of work can be present in subtle ways.

For example, do you volunteer for assignments that will take you out of the office and help you avoid the daily grind? A lot of business travel is, in fact, an evasion - to avoid being at work because the office is hated so much. Perhaps you tend to assign yourself tasks that will ensure you spend a lot of time travelling between depots and so are in the car rather than sitting at your desk.

3. You enjoy disruption Are you happy when machinery breaks down so that work has to stop? Maybe you even consider sabotaging equipment simply to get a break? If your thoughts have gone to these extremes, you should heed the warning and look for a new job.

4. You don't answer calls Even if you appear to be at work - are you really avoiding it? For example, do you turn your phone to voicemail and fail to check your emails until late in the day? …

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5 Signs That It's Time to Change Jobs; Psychology Have You Stayed Too Long? Dr Raj Persaud, Consultant Psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital, Says There May Be Subtle Signs That It's Time to Move On
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