Contemporary Art in U.S. Museums

Artforum International, January 2004 | Go to article overview

Contemporary Art in U.S. Museums


Aspen

Aspen Art Museum

590 North Mill St., Aspen, CO 81611, Tel. 970/925-8050,

www.aspenartmuseum.org

Through Feb. 1 Gregor Schneider

Through Apr. 4 Angela Bulloch: World Reflections

Birmingham

Birmingham Museum of Art

2000 Eighth Ave. North, Birmingham, AL 35203,

Tel. 205/254-2565, www.artsbma.org

Through Jan. 4 Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio: Community Architecture

Through Jan. 4 Eye to Eye: Snapshots from Birmingham, Alabama, Circa 1960

Through Apr. 4 Figuring the Feminine: Selected Works by African-American Women Artists

Through May 2004 Lonnie Holley: Perspectives 8

Boston

Institute of Contemporary Art

955 Boylston St., Boston, MA 02115, Tel. 617/266-5152,

www.icaboston.org

Through Jan. 4 Splat Boom Pow! The Influence of Cartoons in Contemporary Art

Through Jan. 4 Douglas R. Weathersby / Environmental Services: 2003 ICA Artist Prize

Jan. 21 - May 9 Made in Mexico

Chicago

Museum of Contemporary Art

220 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611,

Tel. 312/280-2660, www.mcachicago.org

Through Jan. 18 Kerry James Marshall: One True Thing, Meditations on Black Aesthetics

Through Jul. Alexander Calder in Focus

Through Jul. Strange Days

Feb. 6 - Feb. 29 12 x 12: New Artists/New Work: Deva Maitland

Cleveland

MOCA Cleveland

8501 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106,

Tel. 216/421-8671, www.contemporaryart.org

Through Jan. 4 Yoshitomo Nara: Nothing Ever Happens

Through Feb. 8 Curve Series: Tara Donovan

Opening Jan. 23 Material Witness

Opening Jan. 23 Spencer Tunick: Manmade and Natural

Columbus

Wexner Center for the Arts The Ohio State University

1871 North High St., Columbus, OH 43210,

Tel. 614/292-3535, www.wexarts.org

Jan. 31 - May 2 Splat, Boom, Pow! The Influence of Cartoons in Contemporary Art

Dallas

Dallas Museum of Art

717 N. Harwood St., Dallas, TX 75201, Tel. 214/922-1200,

www.dallasmuseumofart.org

Through Mar. 14 Passion for Art: 100 Treasures 100 Years

Through Apr. 25 Celebrating Sculpture: Modern & Contemporary Works from Dallas Collections

District of Columbia

Corcoran Gallery of Art

500 17th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20006,

Tel. 202/639-1700, www.corcoran.org

Through Jan. 5 Beyond the Frame: Impressionism Revisited, the Sculptures of J. Seward Johnson, Jr.

Through Jan. 26 Atomic Time: Pure Science and Seduction, An Exhibition by Jim Sanborn

Through Apr. The Impressionist Tradition in America

Houston

Menil Collection

1515 Sul Ross, Houston, TX 77006, Tel. 713/525-9400,

www.menil.org

Through Jan. 5 Luisa Lambri

Through Jan. 11 Kasimer Malevich: Suprematism

Contemporary Arts Museum Houston

5216 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006,

Tel. 713/284.8250, www.camh.org

Through Jan. 3 Perspectives 139: Abraham Cruzvillegas

Through Mar. 14 Matthew Ritchie: Proposition Player

Jan. 16 - Apr. 4 Perspectives 140: Anne Wilson

Los Angeles

Museum of Contemporary Art

250 South Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90012,

Tel. 213/626-6222, www.moca.org

Through Jan. 12 Ernesto Neto (MOCA at the Pacific Design Center)

Through Jan. 26 Frank O. Gehry: Work in Progress (MOCA at California Plaza)

Through Jan. 26 Mid-Century Masterworks from the Collection (MOCA at California Plaza)

Ongoing Gregor Schneider: Dead House u r (MOCA at The Geffen Contemporary)

Ongoing Sitings: Installation Art 1969 - 2002 (MOCA at The Geffen Contemporary)

Opening Jan. …

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