Mastering the Art of Public Leadership: The Brookings Institution's Center for Public Policy Education Has Initiated an Innovative Training Program That May Sow the Seeds for a Change in Federal Government Culture through Its First Cohort of Emerging Leaders

By Zauderer, Donald G.; Ridgway, Diane M. | The Public Manager, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Mastering the Art of Public Leadership: The Brookings Institution's Center for Public Policy Education Has Initiated an Innovative Training Program That May Sow the Seeds for a Change in Federal Government Culture through Its First Cohort of Emerging Leaders


Zauderer, Donald G., Ridgway, Diane M., The Public Manager


The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes.

--Marcel Proust

Facing the expected retirement of large numbers of federal executives, many agencies are creating leadership programs in an effort to develop qualified replacements. The retirement problem, however, is confounded by the apparent reality that in the government many supervisors, team leaders, managers, and executives appear to be failing in many dimensions of performance. Results of the US Office of Personnel Management's "2002 Federal Human Capital Survey" are a sobering reflection of how federal employees perceive their superiors:

* 36 percent indicated that leaders generate high levels of motivation and commitment;

* 39 percent said that employees have a feeling of personal empowerment and ownership of work processes;

* 49 percent indicated that supervisors/team leaders are receptive to change;

* 43 percent indicated they hold their organization's leaders in high regard;

* 47 percent believe their organization's leaders maintain high standards of honesty and integrity;

* 44 percent believe complaints, disputes, or grievances are resolved fairly in their work unit; and

* 45 percent believe arbitrary action, personal favoritism, and coercion for partisan political purposes are not tolerated.

Quality of Leadership

If the quality of leadership is related to the ability of agencies to accomplish their missions, then these survey results and their implications should concern us. A more positive scenario would be numbers in the range of 80 percent, resulting in a more satisfied workforce and more effective public policy implementation. The current percentages suggest that developing extraordinary leaders for the federal civil service remains a compelling need.

The Brookings Institution's Center for Public Policy Education is taking on the challenge of developing the next generation of emerging leaders. Mastering the Art of Public Leadership (MAPL) is a leadership training program that was initiated in May 2003 with a cohort group of 15 participants from nine federal agencies. The program was carefully crafted to develop a cadre of reflective leaders who think and act strategically, diagnose problems within their organizations, drive change, and exercise fierce resolve in achieving mandated results.

Professionals in public service are frequently trained in technical fields such as engineering, law, accounting and finance, geography, biology, medicine, geography, soil science, and economics. Their strong technical background enables them to exercise judgment in their field of practice. However, this background may be of little use in the domain of leadership and management. Benjamin Disraeli has stated that, "A man always studying one subject will view the general affairs of the world through the colored prism of his own atmosphere." The MAPL program seeks to expand the capacity of professionals to supplement their technical education with new knowledge in the domain of leadership and organization studies.

This article describes the MAPL program that is based on our current thinking on how to develop the next generation of public service leaders. The Program Effectiveness Model is the framework for this program and was used to guide the development of the program structure, philosophy of practice, and culture. Finally, interviews with our initial cadre of 15 participants add the insights and reactions of students currently attending the program. In this section, student practitioners convey a sense of challenges they face and how the program provides constructive approaches to change, both personal and organizational.

Assumptions

Cognitive Development

It is important to make explicit the pedagogical assumptions underlying the program. The first assumption is that to develop emerging leaders, the program needs to focus on improving the cognitive, emotional, and action skills of participants. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mastering the Art of Public Leadership: The Brookings Institution's Center for Public Policy Education Has Initiated an Innovative Training Program That May Sow the Seeds for a Change in Federal Government Culture through Its First Cohort of Emerging Leaders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.