Goodbye to the Grind!

The Wilson Quarterly, Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

Goodbye to the Grind!


"The Opt-Out Revolution" by Lisa Belkin, in The New York Times Magazine (Oct. 26, 2003), 229 W. 43rd St.. New York, NY. 10036.

"I don't want to be on the fast track leading to a partnership at a prestigious law firm," says Katherine Brokaw, who left that track in order to stay home with her three children. "Some people define that as success. I don't."

She is not alone. Before they ever bump up against a "glass ceiling," more and more highly educated, high-powered professional women are rejecting the workplace and the grim climb upward in favor of stay-at-home motherhood, reports Belkin, a former New York Times reporter who now works from home as a freelance writer and biweekly Times columnist.

Surveys of professional women show that, depending on the profession, between one fourth and one-third are out of the work force. A canvass of women from the Harvard Business School classes of 1981, 1985, and 1991 found only 38 percent working fulltime. Fortune magazine checked on 108 women who'd made its list of"most powerful" women over the years and found that at least 20 had left their jobs (most of them voluntarily) for a less high-powered existence. …

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Goodbye to the Grind!
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