What Kind of Leader Are You? Last October, Some 200 Educators Met in New York City to Connect with Each Other and Ed Tech Experts at the Technology & Learning Tech Forum Conference. Topics Included Security, Data-Driven Decision Making, Leadership Challenges, TCO, and More. below, a Handout from Peter Reilly's Interactive Workshop on Leadership

By Reilly, Peter | Technology & Learning, January 2004 | Go to article overview

What Kind of Leader Are You? Last October, Some 200 Educators Met in New York City to Connect with Each Other and Ed Tech Experts at the Technology & Learning Tech Forum Conference. Topics Included Security, Data-Driven Decision Making, Leadership Challenges, TCO, and More. below, a Handout from Peter Reilly's Interactive Workshop on Leadership


Reilly, Peter, Technology & Learning


Directors of technology and school administrators face enormous pressure as they lead schools through times of unprecedented change and accountability. In the last few years, many technology leaders and school administrators have experienced an incredible expansion of their job descriptions. What started for many as a passion for using technology in their own classrooms has evolved to encompass highly technical infrastructure and telecommunications decisions, complicated project management responsibilities, oversight of sophisticated administrative applications, data reporting, maintenance of district Web pages, management of growing technical support staffs, budget development, strategic planning, policy development, security expertise, board presentations, and, of course, staff development. Building principals and district administrative leadership cabinets have undergone the same exponential growth in the breadth and complexity of their positions.

The result of this crush of responsibility is that many educational leaders suffer from overwork and burnout, making it increasingly difficult for them to provide effective leadership. Many have lost their original passion for technology and have also diminished their personal lives to keep their professional heads above water.

In addition to coping with heavy workloads, most educators have received little help hl the development of their leadership skills. What help they do receive is often in the form of traditional programs involving listening, reading, discussing, and writing. …

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What Kind of Leader Are You? Last October, Some 200 Educators Met in New York City to Connect with Each Other and Ed Tech Experts at the Technology & Learning Tech Forum Conference. Topics Included Security, Data-Driven Decision Making, Leadership Challenges, TCO, and More. below, a Handout from Peter Reilly's Interactive Workshop on Leadership
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