Instructional Activities and Interest in Science Learning for Adolescent Students in Japan and the United States: Findings from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)

By House, J. Daniel | International Journal of Instructional Media, Winter 2003 | Go to article overview

Instructional Activities and Interest in Science Learning for Adolescent Students in Japan and the United States: Findings from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)


House, J. Daniel, International Journal of Instructional Media


An important facet of effective instructional design is the consideration of the effects of learning activities on student motivation. For instance, student motivation has been included in a proposed cognitive model for instructional design (Tennyson, 1992) and its importance for effective instructional design has been emphasized (Main, 1993; Romiszowski, 1989). In order to improve the motivational quality of instructional materials, a motivational model of instructional design has been developed (Keller, 1983; Small, 1997). Further, that model has been tested in field settings (Visser & Keller, 1990) and has been expanded to provide a model of instructional design for application in higher education (Bohlin, Milheim, & Viechnicki, 1993-1994). A strategy has been proposed to incorporate motivational qualities into computer-based instruction (Relan, 1992); these strategies can help students to increase their achievement expectancies and self-efficacy beliefs. These motivational beliefs are significantly related to student achievement in science and mathematics. Students' achievement in first-year college mathematics was significantly correlated with their achievement expectancies (House, 1995). Similarly, achievement expectancies and academic self-concept were significant predictors of subsequent grade performance in college science courses (House, 1993, 1994). Consequently, it is important to examine the motivational qualities of instructional activities since student motivation is significantly related to achievement outcomes.

Several types of instructional programs and activities have been developed to foster student interest in science. Further, programs designed to improve students' knowledge and problem-solving skills may also result in improved confidence levels. For example, a software system designed to teach concepts of immunology to high school students appeared to result in improved student confidence in their ability to successfully solve multiple steps in a problem-based clinical case (Kanowith-Klein, Stave, Stevens, & Casillas, 2001). Several innovative instructional programs have been designed to provide opportunities for elementary and secondary school-aged students to learn science concepts and laboratory techniques. For instance, a program conducted by the University of California (San Francisco) provides sixth-grade students in San Francisco with instruction on topics related to health and biological sciences with the goal of enhancing student interest in science (Doyle, 1999). Similarly, a program coordinated by the University of California (Los Angeles) provides high school students in Los Angeles with integrated science learning and technology-based instructional experiences to facilitate a long-term goal of increased involvement in science careers (Palacio-Cayetano, Kanowith-Klein, & Stevens, 1999). Several investigations have demonstrated that providing students with culturally sensitive learning materials and activities can facilitate student interest in science (Bouillion & Gomez, 2001). Cajete (1988) has outlined several characteristics of the learning styles of American Indian students and has identified a number of culturally relevant instructional strategies that can be used to enhance American Indian students' motivation for science learning. Finally, results from an assessment of science enrichment programs for gifted high school students indicated that enrollment in two consecutive programs was particularly related to positive attitudes toward science (Stake & Mares, 2001).

The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) represents the largest and most comprehensive assessment of educational contexts and student achievement yet conducted (Martin, 1996). As part of the TIMSS assessment, a model was proposed to examine the unique effects of contextual factors on student achievement, such as classroom environment and instructional practices, family expectations and resources, and student self-beliefs (Schmidt & Cogan, 1996). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Instructional Activities and Interest in Science Learning for Adolescent Students in Japan and the United States: Findings from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.