Cough CPR May Work to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

By Jancin, Bruce | Clinical Psychiatry News, January 2004 | Go to article overview

Cough CPR May Work to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death


Jancin, Bruce, Clinical Psychiatry News


VIENNA -- Properly timed self-resuscitative coughing is a life-saving intervention in patients experiencing sudden circulatory arrest in out-of-hospital settings, Dr. Tadeusz K. Petelenz declared at the annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology.

Teaching patients who are at increased risk for sudden cardiac death to recognize the prodromal symptoms and employ cough CPR is simple and inexpensive.

These are skills that should be widely taught, Dr. Petelenz said.

The reason they're not is that very few physicians are familiar with cough CPR because the principal supporting animal and human research was published back in the 1960s and 1970s, according to Dr. Petelenz, who is professor of cardiology at the Silesian Medical School in Katowice, Poland.

Together with American colleagues at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and the University of California, Los Angeles, the Polish cardiologist is on a mission to spread the word on cough CPR.

Here's how it works: A patient experiencing sudden circulatory arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or other causes typically has a 20-to 30-second prodromal period prior to loss of consciousness.

This prodrome is marked by sudden onset of dizziness, shortness of breath, nausea, inappropriate sweating, and/or sudden weakness.

If cough CPR can be initiated during this window, the patient can maintain consciousness and call for help.

Animal studies demonstrate that forceful rhythmic coughing causes a sharp upswing in pressure in the heart, lungs, and thoracic blood vessels.

With each cough, blood is expressed from the lungs through the inert left atrium of the fibrillating heart and then out into the aorta.

From there the blood is pushed out of the thorax and selectively directed to vascular beds served by low-pressure veins.

With each deep inspiration between coughs, blood is drawn along a pressure gradient from the relatively high-pressure aorta through the right heart chambers and into the pulmonary vessels and coronary arteries, Dr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Cough CPR May Work to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.