The Wisdom of Peter Drucker

Journal of Accountancy, February 2004 | Go to article overview

The Wisdom of Peter Drucker


Peter Drucker, the eminent business consultant and a professor of social science and management at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California, offers this sage advice for managers.

* Focus your energy. It's harder to move from incompetence to low-level mediocrity than to move from good performance to excellence.

Drucker offers this insight as part of a strategy to make managers more effective--and efficient--business leaders. He encourages them to concentrate their efforts in areas in which they are strong instead of wasting time trying to improve themselves in areas where they have little competence. It's better, he adds, to delegate to others those tasks in which you have less ability. In the long run, it saves time, money--and lots of personal aggravation.

There are unexpected benefits when you adopt Drucker's way of thinking. As you recognize your weaknesses, you will quite naturally compensate for them by leaning on others to take up those critical tasks. As such, you will learn how much you need others and you also will discover how much you appreciate their skills and abilities. And, even more important, you will begin to exercise more conscious efforts in nurturing those strengths in others, and that will help you build rich, evolving and satisfying relationships with those colleagues.

Taken together, those acquired skills will make you a better manager.

* Track your decisions. Every time you make an important decision or take some major action, keep a record of what you thought would happen because of that choice. Then, a year or so later, go back and compare the actual results with your year-ago expectations.

You may discover, for example, that no matter how hard you tried, you could not accomplish your goal. Or you may find you failed to follow through on certain aspects of the exercise or that you didn't link up with colleagues in your organization who may have had the time, skills or interest to tip the effort toward success. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Wisdom of Peter Drucker
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.