Librarian's Library: Resources for Continuing Education

By Bourdon, Cathleen | American Libraries, February 2004 | Go to article overview

Librarian's Library: Resources for Continuing Education


Bourdon, Cathleen, American Libraries


Abracadabra!

Add some fun to your library instruction program with Magical Library Lessons by Lynne Farrell Stover. Writing for librarians working with students in grades 4-8, Stover shares 15 lesson plans based on the imaginative worlds of popular authors like J. K. Rowling and Brian Jacques and designed to introduce the library, research techniques, and literary concepts. For each lesson, Stover includes a story synopsis, time requirements, objective, materials list, and activity instructions.

85 p., pbk., $16.95 from Upstart Books (1-57950-094-3).

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Better Business Sites

In The Core Business Web: A Guide to Key Information Resources, editor Gary W. White and his cadre of experts identify the best sites in 25 functional areas of business. Included among the essayists are Joseph Straw, who looks at insurance and real estate sites; Stacey Marien, who discusses company information; and David A. Flynn, who reviews accounting sites.

Indexed, 325 p., pbk., previously published as Journal of Business and Finance, vol. 8, nos. 1-4, $29.95 from Haworth Press (0-7890-2095-5).

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Global Freedoms

In the new IFLA/FAIFE World Report 2003, Intellectual Freedom in the Information Society, Libraries, and the Internet, researchers Stuart Hamilton and Susanne Seidelin survey practices in 88 countries--almost double the number included in the 2001 International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions/Committee on Free Access to Information and Freedom of Expression report. Hamilton and Seidelen examine the digital divide, filtering and blocking of information, user privacy, financial barriers, intellectual freedom, and codes of ethics.

239 p., pbk., EUR 27, from IFLA (87-988-013-3-3).

Archives Arrive

Examine the world of archives in these two new titles:

* In the second edition of Developing and Maintaining Practical Archives: A How-to-Do-It Manual for Archivists and Librarians, Gregory S. Hunter shares new information on digital records, archival encoding descriptions, copyright issues, and post-9/11 security concerns. Hunter also covers all aspects of setting up, running, and maintaining an archive.

Indexed, 456 p., pbk., $65 from Neal-Schuman (1-55570-467-0).

* Editor Bruce I. Ambacher and his team of essayists examine the work of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in Thirty Years of Electronic Records. The 12 contributors examine NARA's experience in appraising, accessioning, preserving, describing, and providing access to archival electronic records.

Indexed, 190 p., pbk., $42 from Scarecrow Press (0-8108-4769-8).

Career Pick-Me-Up

Career experts Sarah Johnson and Rachel Singer Gordon focus on professional development opportunities in their new weblog, Beyond the Job, at www.librarycareers.blogspot.com. In daily posts, they provide current information on calls for contributors and presenters, job-search advice, scholarships and grants, and other news and ideas on career development.

Cultivate Your Money Tree

Two new books focus on alternative funding sources:

* Former ALA development director Patricia Martin shares the keys to successful corporate fundraising in Made Possible By: Succeeding with Sponsorship. …

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