China a Player in African Politics; Seeks Access to Country's Raw Materials

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

China a Player in African Politics; Seeks Access to Country's Raw Materials


Byline: Carter Dougherty, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

KIGALI, Rwanda - China has emerged as a major player in African politics, with appeals for developing world solidarity increasingly overshadowed by the country's interest in securing access to vital raw materials.

Though still a poor country by the numbers, China has moved aggressively over the past few years - with development aid and private investment - to tighten relations with resource-rich African nations, with a particular emphasis on assuring access to crude oil.

Economists and Western officials say the Chinese leadership has recognized the long-term needs of the country's fast-growing economy and sees Africa as a region where Beijing's influence over precious commodities can only expand.

"It's about feeding their gigantic economy," said Walter Kansteiner, who recently left the position of assistant secretary of state for Africa.

Two-way trade between Africa and China hit $12.4 billion in 2002, and is likely to register a 50 percent growth in 2003, according to official Chinese statistics. At the end of 2003, Chinese investment in Africa amounted to more than $900 million.

Mr. Kansteiner, who is now involved in African finance as part of the Washington-based Scowcroft Group, said economic interests now largely outweigh political considerations. However, China regularly seeks African support for its claim that Taiwan is a renegade province.

On a trip to Africa this month, Chinese President Hu Jintao outlined his country's policy in a speech to the parliament of Gabon, a small, oil-rich nation on Africa's west coast.

"Our economic cooperation in the future could focus more on infrastructure, agriculture and resources development, and we shall step up our mutually beneficial cooperation to promote common development, thus making both sides winners," he said, to a standing ovation.

Tanzanian President Benjamin Mkapa described China's strategy in a 2002 speech with a proverb from his own country: "Those who arrive at the spring first drink the purest water. …

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